Career Advising

Career and Employment Services offers a variety of resources, both online and in person, no matter where you are in your career planning or job search process.

 

  • Guide to Professional Success (GPS)

    The Guide to Professional Success Program (GPS) offers ongoing, one-on-one career and employment services to students who need additional support. These services are provided in Career and Employment Services (CES) room D1624 at the Truax Campus.

    Students who participate in GPS receive individualized support to:

    • Identify employment options
    • Revise their resume and cover letter
    • Practice their interview skills
    • Look for work study or student help jobs on or off campus
    • Seek internship opportunities
    • Explore careers through workplace tours, job shadowing and informational interviews
    • Learn about job search strategies and how to use and register for Wisconsin TechConnect

    Eligibility Criteria

    Guide to Professional Success is funded by a Federal Perkins grant to serve students experience challenges to finding employment. To be eligible for services, students must be actively enrolled in a minimum of six credits in a technical program during the academic year and be in any of the following categories:

    • Past and/or current academic challenges
    • Receiving services through Disability Resource Services, TRIO/Student Support Services, WorkSmart, Veteran Resources, Men of Excellence, DVR, Scholars of Promise
    • Experiencing other special situations that make completing your program or obtaining work opportunities without intervention, support services, or accommodations challenging.
  • Interviewing Resources

    Thank You Notes

    Always send a thank you note after a job interview. A tailored note makes a solid impression with potential employers, differentiates you from other applicants and reiterates your interest in the position.

    Online Interviewing Resources

    • Guide to Job Interviewing: A collection of the best job interviewing resources and tools — including tips, articles and tutorials to help you succeed in any employment interview situation.
    • Interviewing Success: Insights designed to help you successfully interview for and get the job you want, as well as negotiate the best job offer.
    • Job-Interview.net: A broad range of topics dealing with job interviews such as resumes, education, additional courses, translations, jobs and salary negotiations.
    • Career and Employment Services Interview Guide and How-To: Use this guide to help a jump start on your interview preparation!

  • Job Search

    The resources below will help you create written materials to use in your job search.

    Resume

    Your resume provides an overview of your individual skills and qualifications that employers seek. Utilize the tools below to create or edit your resume.

    Career and Employment Services Resume Guide and How-To: Use this guide to learn about what to include on your resume and find tips for making it look appealing. 

    Career and Employment Services Cover Letter Guide and How-To: Use this guide to learn how to write an effective cover letter!  Samples included!

     

    CareerOneStop Resume Guide: Create a resume that helps you stand out in today's job market with this step-by-step guide.

    Job Center of Wisconsin Resume Publications: Find a basic guide to writing your resume. 

    Cover Letter

    Cover letters provide an opportunity to introduce yourself and sell your skills to a prospective employer.

    CAREERwise - Find additional tips on writing cover letters

    Thank You Notes

    Always send a thank you note after a job interview. A tailored note makes a solid impression with potential employers, differentiates you from other applicants and reiterates your interest in the position.

    Online Networking

    Social networking sites have become a popular job search tool for both job seekers and employers. Here's what you need to know before you log on.

    Authorization to Disclose Academic Information and Grades

    Whether applying to graduate school or for a new job, letters of recommendation often are necessary and almost always help your application stand out. To help your references, write them a concise letter requesting their participation.

    Student Reference Request form (PDF, 777KB)

    • Make sure to give references at least three weeks to complete their recommendations.
    • In your request, be as specific as possible. Where is the letter going? And for what purpose?
    • If you have not been in contact with your reference recently, include your updated resume with your request.
    • Always write a brief note thanking your reference for his or her time.
  • Non-Traditional Occupations

    Nontraditional Occupations

    A nontraditional career is defined as one in which fewer than 25 percent of the workforce is of one gender. For women, many nontraditional careers fall into a few broad categories of jobs: skilled trades, scientific/technical and supervisory. And while fewer nontraditional careers are available for men than women, these careers tend to involve education, health and service-related jobs.

    According to the National Skills Coalition, middle-skill jobs -- defined as requiring education beyond high school but not a four-year degree -- make up the largest part of the labor market in the United States. This means that there aren’t enough skilled workers to fill high-demand, high-paying jobs. The growing economy needs everyone, especially women, to consider careers in the skilled trades industry.

    Benefits

    • Job satisfaction and retention
    • Economic self-sufficiency
    • Increased education/training/skill
    • High demand for skilled workers
    • Career advancement

    Potential Challenges

    • Isolation
    • Work/life balance
    • Not having mentors within the profession
    • Fear of harassment/discrimination
    • Lack of family/friends support

    Contact Student Support Services        

    The Career and Employment Center (CEC) provides a variety of career planning and employment support for current Madison College students and alumni. 

    To learn more about Nontraditional Occupation support, please contact:

    Masaya Xiong
    Non-Traditional Occupations Advisor
    MXiong27@madisoncollege.edu(link sends e-mail)

    Nontraditional Occupations Employment

    United State Department of Labor-Women's Bureau: Quick facts about nontraditional occupations for women

    Bureau of Labor Statistics-Women Workers: The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides extensive labor market data on women (and other worker groups) through its news releases, publications and website. Users have access to data on women's employment, unemployment and earnings by industry, occupation, education, age, marital status and other characteristics. Data is also available on workplace injuries and illnesses experienced by women. Data also os available for men.

    National Alliance for Partnerships In Equity: NAPE is a consortium of state and local agencies, corporations and national organizations that strives to achieve its mission of building educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

    Occupational Outlook Handbook: Provides career resources and a database to find occupations filtered by skills, education, growth rate, projected job outlook and wages.

    Wisconsin WORKnet-Women: Provides information on skills, education credentials, job outlook and wages of specific nontraditional occupations for women.  

    Wisconsin WORKnet-Men: Provides information on skills, education credentials, job outlook and wages of specific nontraditional occupations for men.