Career & Employment Additional Services

We offer several additional employment services through partnerships within our community.

  • Consider Nontraditional Occupations for nontraditional students.
  • The Guide to Professional Success Program (GPS) offers ongoing, one-on-one career and employment services to students who need additional support.

See a full listing of all our services (PDF, 187KB).

Nontraditional

Nontraditional Occupations

A nontraditional career is defined as one in which fewer than 25 percent of the workforce is of one gender. For women, many nontraditional careers fall into a few broad categories of jobs: skilled trades, scientific/technical and supervisory. And while fewer nontraditional careers are available for men than women, these careers tend to involve education, health and service-related jobs.

According to the National Skills Coalition, middle-skill jobs -- defined as requiring education beyond high school but not a four-year degree -- make up the largest part of the labor market in the United States. This means that there aren’t enough skilled workers to fill high-demand, high-paying jobs. The growing economy needs everyone, especially women, to consider careers in the skilled trades industry.

Benefits

  • Job satisfaction and retention
  • Economic self-sufficiency
  • Increased education/training/skill
  • High demand for skilled workers
  • Career advancement

Potential Challenges

  • Isolation
  • Work/life balance
  • Not having mentors within the profession
  • Fear of harassment/discrimination
  • Lack of family/friends support

Contact Student Support Services        

The Career and Employment Center (CEC) provides a variety of career planning and employment support for current Madison College students and alumni. 

To learn more about Nontraditional Occupation support, please contact:

Masaya Xiong
Non-Traditional Occupations Advisor
MXiong27@madisoncollege.edu

Nontraditional Occupations Employment

United State Department of Labor-Women's Bureau: Quick facts about nontraditional occupations for women

Bureau of Labor Statistics-Women Workers: The Bureau of Labor Statistics provides extensive labor market data on women (and other worker groups) through its news releases, publications and website. Users have access to data on women's employment, unemployment and earnings by industry, occupation, education, age, marital status and other characteristics. Data is also available on workplace injuries and illnesses experienced by women. Data also os available for men.

National Alliance for Partnerships In Equity: NAPE is a consortium of state and local agencies, corporations and national organizations that strives to achieve its mission of building educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity and workforce diversity.

Occupational Outlook Handbook: Provides career resources and a database to find occupations filtered by skills, education, growth rate, projected job outlook and wages.

Wisconsin WORKnet-Women: Provides information on skills, education credentials, job outlook and wages of specific nontraditional occupations for women.  

Wisconsin WORKnet-Men: Provides information on skills, education credentials, job outlook and wages of specific nontraditional occupations for men.  

Guide to Professional Success (GPS)

GUIDE TO PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS INTEREST FORM

The Guide to Professional Success Program (GPS) offers ongoing, one-on-one career and employment services to students who need additional support. These services are provided in Career and Employment Services (CES) room D1624 at the Truax Campus.

Students who participate in GPS receive individualized support to:

  • Identify employment options
  • Revise their resume and cover letter
  • Practice their interview skills
  • Look for work study or student help jobs on or off campus
  • Seek internship opportunities
  • Explore careers through workplace tours, job shadowing and informational interviews
  • Learn about job search strategies and how to use and register for Wisconsin TechConnect

Eligibility Criteria

Guide to Professional Success is funded by a Federal Perkins grant to serve students experience challenges to finding employment. To be eligible for services, students must be actively enrolled in a minimum of six credits in a technical program during the academic year and be in any of the following categories:

  • Past and/or current academic challenges
  • Receiving services through Disability Resource Services, TRIO/Student Support Services, WorkSmart, Veteran Resources, Men of Excellence, DVR, Scholars of Promise
  • Experiencing other special situations that make completing your program or obtaining work opportunities without intervention, support services, or accommodations challenging.

Government Summer Internship Programs

The City of Madison and the State of Wisconsin have several paid summer internships for students. These programs provide racial/ethnic minorities, female students and students with disabilities an opportunity to gain valuable work experience and training in various occupational areas and branches of local and state government. Internship consideration for City of Madison positions also will be given for individuals who have experienced a period of long-term unemployment or underemployment.

For more details, contact Career and Employment Services.