South Campus History & Meeting Minutes

Further information about the Madison College South Campus Initiative planning.

  1. South Campus Meeting Minutes - March

    March 2, 2017
    March 28, 2017


    March 2, 2017

    Madison College South Campus Initiative Advisory Committee Meeting Notes

    Date: March 2, 2017
    Time: 4:30 – 6:00 PM
    Location: The Atrium community room
    Recorded by: Zia Brucaya

    Advisory Council Members Present: Sal Carranza, UW-System Administration, Senior Policy Advisor; Jessica Cavazos, Latino Chamber of Commerce, Executive Director; Mike Miller, City of Madison Office of Business Resources, Business Development Specialist; Zach Brandon, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, President; Paul Jadin, MadREP, President; Mai Zong Vue, Hmong Community, Cultural Trainer and Folk Singer; Wesley Sparkman, Dane County Office of Equity and Inclusion, Director; Michael Seleskie, South Madison Resident; Dezarae House, South Madison Resident; Dr. Ruben Anthony, Urban League of Greater Madison, President/CEO; Charles Brown, Madison College, Adult Basic & Development Education Instructor; Mick Rusch, Metro Transit, Transit Marketing and Customer Service Manager; Angie Jones, United Way, Community Impact Director; Dr. Antonio Molina Rivas, Madison College, Leadership Development Program Director

    Additional Participants Present: Dr. Daniels, Madison College, President; Dr. Tim Casper, Madison College, VP, Institutional Learning and Effectiveness; Lucia Nunez, Madison College, VP, Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Valentina Ahedo, Madison College, Associate Dean and South Campus Manager; Melissa Huggins, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant; Zia Brucaya, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant

    Advisory Council Members Absent: Karen Menendez Coller, Centro Hispano, Executive Director; Dan Brown, Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison, Executive Director; Ananda Mirilli, South Madison Resident

    Agenda Item: Project Overview

    Discussion:

    • A presentation of the Madison College South Campus Initiative background, purpose, timeline and community engagement process was given by Dr. Daniels, Melissa Huggins and Tim Casper.

    Questions:

    • Mr. Jadin: What is the process for finalizing the new facility?

      • Dr. Daniels: I will bring a location recommendation to the College Board. The Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) board will then have to approve the facility and programs. WTCS is a 2-step process that includes an initial concept review, followed by final approval. The Higher Learning Commission will have to approve the facility for programs that require accreditation.

    Action Items:

    Urban Assets: Share presentation and notes with the group.

    Agenda Item: Community Engagement Process Discussion

    Discussion:

    • Ms. Zong: I am excited about the family piece. We tend to silo by age or role rather than thinking of families as a unit. Madison College can be a strength to the community by being a temporary transition home for new immigrants and new residents. The college could help families and individuals acculturate, become comfortable, and feel stronger rather than more vulnerable.

    • Dr. Anthony: Could the new facility be located anywhere within the boundaries shown in the South Madison service area map?

      • Dr. Daniels: Technically, yes, but we are focusing our efforts in the central portion to enhance access. We also need to make sure that we are accessible by transit and other forms of transportation. We are looking at any existing facility that fits our need for 50,000-70,000 square feet, whether it is on the market or not.

    • Mr. Seleskie: I come from a community that emphasized the importance of a four-year or higher degree. I went to a four-year college, left without a degree, and entered a job that requires no degree and pays well. It is important to drive the narrative within our communities that it is possible to be successful without a four-year or higher degree.

      • Dr. Daniels: Yes; we will have bridge programming to four-year colleges, but we will also be focusing on building blocks, in addition to entrepreneurial skill-building.

    • Mr. Miller: Has the college done economic impact studies?

      • Dr. Daniels: Yes. I do not have the figures on hand, but the College creates economic impacts in the hundreds of millions of dollars. We have also done area-specific studies on the impact in the south, west, and the east.

    • Ms. Jones: Will the college be working with MMSD, other school districts and community based organizations to reach out to students who have dropped out? Will seniors (older adults) also be included?

      • Dr. Daniels: Yes, we are focusing on a very broad age range. Lucia is doing a lot of the outreach work with community organizations to reach students who have dropped out. We will also have dual credit and early college initiatives to get students onto the south campus and feeling comfortable. We will soon be having a series of outreach meetings with groups such as faith-based organizations to enhance our outreach; the advisory council will be made aware of these.

    • Mr. Miller: 41% of the African American population in Madison is living in poverty. These are massive numbers. How does this play into the College’s strategy?

      • Dr. Daniels: Very much so. This is a concern that we are looking at very closely.

    • Mr. Carranza: It is very important to connect the concept moving up through k-12

    • Dr. Anthony: We are seeing growth in the “gig” economy, in which people are working for themselves through platforms like Uber. Has the College looked at this?

      • Dr. Daniels: The challenge here is that these businesses are hard to sustain and scale. However, we will be offering entrepreneurial skill-building courses.

    • Mr. Carranza: This is important. We have lost more businesses than we have created in WI.

    • Ms. Cavazos: Dual-language offerings are very important. Latinos need to understand how licensing works, how to build capacity, etc. We can get them started, but they need more. We have been having other cultures coming into the Latino Chamber, often because of the perception that Latinos are very open and welcoming, so this could be a component of the new campus.

    • Are you planning the building around current demand, or the expectation that we will grow the demand?

      • Dr. Daniels: Both. We need to address current needs, but think about how we can expand as needed. This is not just about the students – there is a business side to this. We need to understand what is going to work best inside of the building, which has not been designed yet.

      • Melissa: An important role of the Advisory Council is to help digest and frame the data we gather from the community, and thereby inform the College on the future facility design and programming.

    Agenda Item: Wrap-up

    Discussion:

    The next advisory council meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 28, in classroom SM148.


    March 28, 2017 

    Madison College South Campus Initiative Advisory Committee Meeting Notes

    Date: March 28, 2017
    Time: 4:30 – 6:00 PM
    Location: The Atrium community room
    Recorded by: Zia Brucaya

    Advisory Council Members Present: Sal Carranza, UW-System Administration, Senior Policy Advisor; Jessica Cavazos,Latino Chamber of Commerce, Executive Director; Mike Miller,City of Madison Office of Business Resources, Business Development Specialist; Zach Brandon,Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, President; Paul Jadin,MadREP, President; Mai Zong Vue,Hmong Community, Cultural Trainer and Folk Singer; Wesley Sparkman,Dane County Office of Equity and Inclusion, Director; Dan Brown,Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison, Executive Director; Michael Seleskie, South Madison Resident; Dezarae House, South Madison Resident; Ananda Mirilli,South Madison Resident; Charles Brown,Madison College, Adult Basic & Development Education Instructor; Dr. Antonio Molina Rivas,Madison College, Leadership Development Program Director

    Additional Participants Present: Dr. Daniels,Madison College, President; Dr. Tim Casper,Madison College, VP, Institutional Learning and Effectiveness; Dr. Keith Cornille,Madison College, Sr. VP, Student Development and Success; Lucia Nuñez,Madison College, VP, Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Valentina Ahedo,Madison College, Associate Dean and South Campus Manager; Mark Thomas,Madison College, VP of Administrative Services; Melissa Huggins, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant; Zia Brucaya, AICP,Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant;

    Advisory Council Members Absent: Karen Menendez Coller,Centro Hispano, Executive Director; Dr. Ruben Anthony,Urban League of Greater Madison, President/CEO; Mick Rusch, Metro Transit, Transit Marketing and Customer Service Manager; Angie Jones,United Way, Community Impact Director;

    Agenda Item: Overview of New Facility Regulatory Issues

    Discussion:

    Mark Thomas, Vice President of Administrative Services at Madison College, discussed the regulatory issues influencing the process of identifying a new facility in South Madison:

    • Madison College is looking for a 50,000-70,000 square foot facility with 250-270 parking spaces. There will be a 9-12 month construction timeline no matter where the new facility ends up.

    • The College has been talking with the City about possibilities for expansion at the current site, as well as renovating and relocating to a number of other existing facilities within the South Madison service area, including ETF and WEAC.

    • Any remodel projects over $30,000 must be approved by the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) Board, and cannot exceed $1.5 million.

    • If we build the new facility from scratch, it would cost about $15 million for the new South Campus, but anything over $1.5 million for new development must be approved by the state board. However, we can get gifts and donations to exceed the $1.5 million budget.

    • The College can also remodel the existing space at the Villager Mall.

    • Equipment investments made today, including temporary walls, will be reusable in a new location.

    • The progress of the South Campus is in no way tied to or limited by what happens with the Downtown campus.

    • Mr. C. Brown: How is Madison College benefiting from the sale of the Downtown property? Will it benefit the new South Campus?

      • Mr. Thomas: The two are not directly tied. Someone will eventually lease the downtown block from us for several hundred thousand dollars per year. It is currently costing us about $1 million in annual operating expenses, which will be saved when we move out. The new South Campus facility will cost substantially less than that. All of this money comes out of and goes into the college’s general fund. The current south campus costs about $250,000 per year to lease from the city.

    • Mr. Seleskie: Are you pursuing the referendum as a financing mechanism?

      • Mr. Thomas: We have not started conversations about that. We are trying to move forward without a referendum. If we are out of options about one year from now, we will look at it as a last resort.

    • Mr. Carranza: Could another option be to have someone build a new campus for the College to lease?

      • Mr. Thomas: The issue here is magnitude. The WTCS Board will get apprehensive about leasing a space of the size we require because it would circumvent the referendum process. However, it may be easier and more palatable to the Board to expand at our current South Campus facility.

    • Mr. Seleskie: What is the relationship between the Downtown and new South Campus in terms of classes?

      • Mr. Thomas: The processes are happening in parallel, so we are planning for many programs to come out of Downtown and move to the new South Campus. Ideally, one project does not happen before the other, but we will likely need to muddle through for about a year.

    • Ms. Mirilli: Have you done a survey of students and staff? Are you looking at spaces with the intention to eventually expand the South Campus facility in the future?

      • Mr. Thomas: Yes, we have surveyed the students and staff. We are not sure about future expansion; our ability to do so will depend on what spaces are available. If there is a site that offers the opportunity for expansion, we would like that, but our minimum requirement is 50,000 square feet.

    Agenda Item: Community Survey

    Discussion:

    • Urban Assets requested feedback from the Advisory Council on the content of the draft community survey. Some edits and comments were shared at the meeting, and some were sent to Urban Assets over email.

    • The Council discussed opportunities to disseminate the community survey, including:

      • Sharing the link through professional associations and churches

      • Setting up computers and/or paper copies at locations such as Centro Hispano, Joining Forces for Families, the library and St. Vinny’s

      • In-person meetings to review with groups that may not understand or like surveys

    • Ms. Zong Vue: We are missing outreach to refugees. How do we reach to understand what they want and need?

    • Ms. Nuñez: We have also talked about translating the survey into languages such as Spanish and Hmong, but wonder if we are better off working with these groups one on one.

    Action Items:

    Urban Assets will email the Council to participate in a dry-run of the community survey and to identify ways that each member is able to help with distribution.

    Agenda Item: Wrap-up

    Discussion:

    • The website for the South Campus Initiative is: https://madisoncollege.edu/south-campus-initiative. All Advisory Council minutes may be found under the yellow “Minutes and Materials” tab. You may also navigate here from the Madison College main page by scrolling to the bottom, clicking “Governance and Leadership,” and clicking “South Campus Initiative” on the left hand side.

    • The next Advisory Council meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 25, 4:30-6:00PM in the Atrium Community Room.

  2. South Campus Meeting Minutes - April, May, June

    April 25, 2017
    May 23, 2017
    June 27, 2017


    April 25, 2017

    Madison College South Campus Initiative Advisory Committee Meeting Notes

    Date: April 25, 2017
    Time: 4:30 – 6:00 PM
    Location: The Atrium community room
    Recorded by: Zia Brucaya

    Advisory Council Members Present: Sal Carranza, UW-System Administration, Senior Policy Advisor; Jessica Cavazos, Latino Chamber of Commerce, Executive Director; Mai Zong Vue, Hmong Community, Cultural Trainer and Folk Singer; Dezarae House, South Madison Resident; Dr. Ruben Anthony, Urban League of Greater Madison, President/CEO;

    Additional Participants Present: Dr. Daniels, Madison College, President; ; Dr. Tim Casper, Madison College, VP, Institutional Learning and Effectiveness; ; Dr. Keith Cornille, Madison College, Sr. VP, Student Development and Success; ; Lucia Nuñez, Madison College, VP, Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; ; Valentina Ahedo, Madison College, Associate Dean and South Campus Manager; ; Melissa Huggins, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant; ; Zia Brucaya, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant

    Advisory Council Members Absent: Mike Miller, City of Madison Office of Business Resources, Business Development Specialist; Zach Brandon, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, President; Paul Jadin, MadREP, President; Wesley Sparkman, Dane County Office of Equity and Inclusion, Director; Dan Brown, Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison, Executive Director; Michael Seleskie, South Madison Resident; Ananda Mirilli, South Madison Resident; Charles Brown, Madison College, Adult Basic & Development Education Instructor; Mick Rusch, Metro Transit, Transit Marketing and Customer Service Manager; Angie Jones, United Way, Community Impact Director; Dr. Antonio Molina Rivas, Madison College, Leadership Development Program Director; Jason Beloungy, Access to Independence, Assistant Director

    Agenda Item: Overview of 2016 Economic Impact Analysis

    Discussion:

    Dr. Tim Casper shared results of the 2016 economic impact analysis report by Emsi, which looks at the economic impact of Madison College within Dane County and within the south quadrant of Dane County. See attached for more information:

    1. PowerPoint presentation, “EMSI Dane and South Economic Impact_25Apr17”

    2. Fact Sheet: The Economic Value of Madison Area Technical College

    3. Fact Sheet: The Economic Value of Madison Area Technical College on the South Quadrant of Dane County

    4. Executive Summary: Dane County

    5. Executive Summary: South Quadrant

    Discussion:

    • Mr. Carranza: Did Emsi calculate the benefit to companies of not having to spend money to find appropriately skilled workers, because Madison College is making those connections?

      • Mr. Casper: No, they did not drill down to that level.

    Agenda Item: South Campus Marketing Campaign

    Discussion:

    Dr. Keith Cornille and Valentina Ahedo shared information about the Madison College South marketing campaign and planned outreach.

    • Madison College is currently implementing a marketing campaign to get the word out about the enhanced offerings at the current South Campus. The campaign will include inserts in the Wisconsin State Journal, door hangers, direct mailers (five drops in the South Madison zip codes), radio ads (including in Spanish markets), and electronic print ads on Facebook. The timeline is January-December 2017.

    • This process will be a resource for gaining feedback on the community survey for the future South Campus.

    • We know the marketing is working in part because we have been over-enrolling the Smart Start sessions at the South Campus. These sessions provide placement testing, help completing the Madison College program application, career counseling and financial aid assistance. In comparison, the first Smart Start session did not align with the direct mailers and email blasts, and enrollment numbers were very low, in the single digits.

    • Boots on the ground outreach will involve teams of two going throughout the South Madison zip codes with door hangers and talking to people if they are home. The hangers will not include a link to the survey, but the others tools we use can be modified to include it.

    • Dr. Daniels: How does Madison College connect with community organizations?

      • Ms. Ahedo: There are organizations we work closely with such as the Urban League and Centro Hispano, whom we have asked to share information with their networks. We will also ask if they can place a link on their websites.

    • Mr. Carranza: How expensive are the “targeted display ads” like those on Spotify?

      • Dr. Cornille: These cost about $6,000 to run from March-December. We will be doing those as well, but not sure on which sites.

    • Mr. Carranza: It sounds like this is designed for non-traditional students; I have not heard about engaging high school students.

      • Dr. Cornille: We have a separate campaign for high school students that is very effective. High school applications and enrollments have increased dramatically. There is a friendly competition between La Follette, East and Sun Prairie. Enrollments from West are still not as strong as we would like.

    Agenda Item: Community Survey Distribution Survey Strategy

    Discussion:

    • Ms. Zong Vue: The Hmong Association is doing some strategic planning and will be a good group and process to tap into. Their first meeting will be on May 21st. It will involve strategic planning for the Wisconsin Hmong Association in Dane County. Can share contact info for the Executive Director. Also add the Hmong Educational Council, which works with high school students; the Hmong Professional Networking Group; the Hmong New Year Committee (actively meets and would be easy to plug into); and Freedom, Inc.

    • Mr. Carranza: Add Latino professional Association (Tanya Barra); Latino Education Council (Sal); and the Latino Coalition for Action, which is currently an informal organization that includes all of the leaders of Latino organizations in Dane County (mailing list hits everyone).

    • Dr. Anthony: Add African American Council of Churches and NAACP. Also include the Black Greeks, Women of Distinction and The Links.

    • Urban Assets will provide email templates for Advisory Council members to assist with distribution of the survey and targeted invitations to participate.

    • Are there specific groups or places that should get paper copies?

      • Ms. Zong Vue: The Hmong Language and Culture Program website will be good to link to. We can talk further about in-person groups that should be organized.

      • Mr. Carranza: Bring paper surveys at next LaSup meeting. Also provide them with a simple email and survey link to distribute to their networks.

      • Ms. Cavazos: Make participating feel fun and easy. Have young people out at different community events to encourage feedback. Can there be a Facebook link? The Latino Chamber is very active on Facebook and Twitter. Spice it up and explain the “why” for this audience.

        • Work with Jessica on getting feedback from tomorrow’s event.

      • Dr. Anthony: Visit Mt. Zion Baptist Church; about 400 people that attend. Bring paper surveys and have a table. Also the Unity Picnic on July 22nd at the Villager Mall; about 700 people attend.

      • Ms. House: Bring paper surveys to YWCA. Contact Nancy Rembach or Libby Tucci.

      • Ms. Huggins: We will ask Advisory Council members to help us contact their local neighborhood associations.

      • Ms. Nunez: Charles Brown asked us to add more churches.

        • Add Christ the Solid Rock, Pastor Everett Mitchell; Fountain of Life, Pastor Alex Gee.

    • What is the target population and timeline?

      • Target population is people who live and work in the area that this campus would serve. Trying to get a wide variety of perspectives – parents, current and prospective students, businesses, community organizations, etc.

      • The survey will be open for 2-3 months. We do not want to create a hard “end-by” date so that we have the flexibility to discover if we are missing certain groups and need to do additional outreach.

    • Keith and Lucia will help organize iPads and pulling a targeted list by zip code of current and admitted students. Can set up an iPad at the current South Campus. Work with Valentina to coordinate on-foot survey volunteers.

    Action Items:

    Email template for Advisory Council members.

    Add recommended groups to contacts matrix.

    Agenda Item: Wrap-up

    Discussion:

    • Urban Assets will poll the Advisory Committee about changing the meeting time from 5:00-6:00PM.

    • The next Advisory Council meeting will be held on Tuesday, May 23, 4:30-6:00PM, in the Atrium Community Room.


    May 23, 2017

    Madison College South Campus Initiative Advisory Committee Meeting Notes

    Date: May 23, 2017
    Time: 4:30 – 5:30 PM
    Location: Madison College South Campus, SM104
    Recorded by: Katie Fadelli

    Advisory Council Members Present: Sal Carranza, UW-System Administration, Senior Policy Advisor; Paul Jadin, MadREP, President; Michael Seleskie, South Madison Resident; Ananda Mirilli, South Madison Resident; Charles Brown, Madison College, Adult Basic & Development Education Instructor; Angie Jones, United Way, Community Impact Director; Dr. Antonio Molina Rivas, Madison College, Leadership Development Program Director; Jason Beloungy, Access to Independence, Assistant Director

    Additional Participants Present: Dr. Daniels, Madison College, President; Dr. Tim Casper, Madison College, VP, Institutional Learning and Effectiveness; Dr. Keith Cornille, Madison College, Sr. VP, Student Development and Success; Lucia Nuñez, Madison College, VP, Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Valentina Ahedo, Madison College, Associate Dean and South Campus Manager; Melissa Huggins, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant

    Advisory Council Members Absent: Jessica Cavazos, Latino Chamber of Commerce, Executive Director; Mike Miller, City of Madison Office of Business Resources, Business Development Specialist; Zach Brandon, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, President; Mai Zong Vue, Hmong Community, Cultural Trainer and Folk Singer; Wesley Sparkman, Dane County Office of Equity and Inclusion, Director; Dan Brown, Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison, Executive Director; Dezarae House, South Madison Resident; Dr. Ruben Anthony, Urban League of Greater Madison, President/CEO; Mick Rusch, Metro Transit, Transit Marketing and Customer Service Manager

    Additional Participants Absent: Zia Brucaya, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant

    Agenda Item: Update on DTEC and Future South Campus Location

    Discussion:

    Dr. Daniels gave an update to the group on the plans for the Downtown Education Center (DTEC):

    • The board has approved Hovde Properties to be the developer of the downtown site. The City of Madison approval processes can now begin and will likely be done by the end of summer 2018.

    • The board will bring an initial request to the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) in July and then again at the end of the approval process.

    • He expects that everything will be moved out of DTEC by early to mid-2019, but programs may be moved earlier as we find spaces at other locations for them. Offerings are already being reduced at DTEC, for example the Cosmetology program has been moved to Truax.

    • Ananda asked to what extend the DTEC transition is tied to the new South Madison campus. Dr. Daniels explained that they are independent of each other, meaning that if the plans for DTEC were to fall through for some reason, the new South Campus would still move forward.

    • The location of the new South Campus is still in discussion. Dr. Daniels hopes to have much more news regarding the facility by September or October. He is encouraged by the progress that has been made and by the conversations going on behind the scenes with donors and the City of Madison.

    • Dr. Daniels explained that the goal for the new South Campus is a 7 day a week facility, where a new student could go first and complete a degree. The space needs to be fully utilized which is why the results of the survey will be important.

    • Ananda asked if there have been any conversations on improving transportation on the South Side to improve access for students. Dr. Daniels noted that there have been conversations with Madison Metro. A traffic study is currently in progress, and there have been discussions about the adjacent transfer station and possible use of shuttles.

    • The group discussed ways to improve the parking situation at the Villager Mall campus, including sharing parking spaces with Park Bank and with Mt. Zion.

    Agenda Item: Community Survey

    Discussion:

    Melissa presented an overview of the Community Survey distribution strategy process and needs from the Advisory Council:

    • The new logo will be added to the survey so that it is ready to go out this week. Jason Beloungy will also review the survey and distribution process to improve accessibility by those in the community with disabilities.

    • Melissa emphasized that the role of the advisory committee members is to act as the initiative’s connection to the community. She asked that the committee members go through the community contact matrix and

    • The group reviewed the current list of contacts and brainstormed other suggestions, including:

      • The weekly Centro Market

      • The Disability Pride celebration at Tenney Park

      • The open house held every Tuesday at Leopold Middle School

      • Hmong cultural program at Badger Rock Middle School

      • Buying an ad/posting the link on La Movida

      • Fiesta Italia

      • African Fest

      • United Way community teams

      • Umoja

      • MadRep newsletter

      • Pre-school year backpack giveaways, led by 1000 Black Men of WI

      • Local hair salons, barber shops, laundromats, and convenience stores

    • Keith Cornille asked that outreach articulate the idea that you can start your education at Madison College now and don’t have to wait until this new campus is built.

    • Antonio noted that to encourage people to take the survey and take courses 3 credits, or the chance to donate 3 credits, will be offered as a prize. Madison College tokens will be brought to events where people are asked to take the survey in person.

    Agenda Item: Community Meeting #1

    Discussion:

    Melissa reviewed the goals and proposed agenda of the first community meeting to be held on June 14th, 2017 from 6:00-7:30 PM.

    • A more finalized agenda will be sent to the Advisory Council closer to the meeting date. Some advisory council members expressed interest in attending and helping to facilitate the event. The number of facilitators needed will depend on the number of attendees. Melissa noted that 40-50 attendees would be a good turnout. The target audience is anyone in the South service area.

    • The group asked whether transportation and childcare will be provided. The PMT will discuss provided transportation from a key location or neighborhood center. Lucia suggested that the library across the hall be used for childcare. 4C sometimes provides childcare volunteers. Keith suggested reaching out to Donna at Madison College for help on this.

    Agenda Item: Wrap-up

    Discussion:

    • Next meeting: June 27, 4:30-5:30, Room SM104

     


    June 27, 2017

     

    Madison College South Campus Initiative Advisory Committee Meeting Notes

    Date: June 27, 2017
    Time: 4:30 – 5:30 PM
    Location: Madison College South Campus, SM104
    Recorded by: Katie Fadelli

    Advisory Council Members Present: Sal Carranza, UW-System Administration, Senior Policy Advisor; Paul Jadin, MadREP, President; Ananda Mirilli, South Madison Resident; Charles Brown, Madison College, Adult Basic & Development Education Instructor; Dr. Antonio Molina Rivas, Madison College, Leadership Development Program Director; Jason Beloungy, Access to Independence, Assistant Director

    Additional Participants Present: Dr. Daniels, Madison College, President; Dr. Tim Casper, Madison College, VP, Institutional Learning and Effectiveness; Dr. Keith Cornille, Madison College, Sr. VP, Student Development and Success; Lucia Nuñez, Madison College, VP, Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Valentina Ahedo, Madison College, Associate Dean and South Campus Manager; Melissa Huggins, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant

    Advisory Council Members Absent: Jessica Cavazos, Latino Chamber of Commerce, Executive Director; Mike Miller, City of Madison Office of Business Resources, Business Development Specialist; Zach Brandon, Greater Madison Chamber of Commerce, President; Mai Zong Vue, Hmong Community, Cultural Trainer and Folk Singer; Wesley Sparkman, Dane County Office of Equity and Inclusion, Director; Dan Brown, Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison, Executive Director; Michael Seleskie, South Madison Resident; Dezarae House, South Madison Resident; Dr. Ruben Anthony, Urban League of Greater Madison, President/CEO; Mick Rusch, Metro Transit, Transit Marketing and Customer Service Manager; Angie Jones, United Way, Community Impact Director;

    Additional Participants Absent: Zia Brucaya, AICP, Urban Assets/ South Campus Engagement Process Consultant

    Agenda Item: Special Announcement on Future of South Campus

    Discussion:

    Dr. Daniels shared with the group that there has been positive movement towards securing a new facility and expects being able to discuss more openly within 60-90 days. He noted that the boots on the ground outreach for enrollment in South Madison will begin on July 10th and hoped that Advisory Council members will be increasingly engaged as the project moves forward.

    Agenda Item: Community Survey Results to Date

    Discussion:

    Melissa reviewed the community survey results to date, noting that our goal is to get to 1000 responses by the end of July. There will be another push to get the survey links out through social media, by the Urban League and Centro Hispano.

    Key takeaways from the survey responses received to date:

    • Less than 30% are unfamiliar with Madison College

    • More than 50% have taken classes at Madison College

    • The majority of those split between Truax and Downtown

    • 90% rated the instruction experience as Good or Excellent

    • 32% rated the student services as Good, the rest split between Adequate and Excellent

    • Majority of respondents are either not pursuing higher education OR currently or planning to attend another college

    Top areas of study (more than 50% ranked as Very Important):

    • Adult Education, Business Management, Early childhood education, ESL, Finance & Accounting, GED, Nursing Assistant, Healthcare, Information technology, STEM

    Top student services (more than 50% ranked as Very Important):

    • Convenient access to multi-modal transportation, academic advising, career & employment services, counseling & mentoring, programs for older adults, academic support, testing services, disability services

    Top Facility Amenities (more than 50% ranked as Very Important):

    • Small study areas, nearby food access, bus access (nearly 90%), bike parking; (Somewhat to Very Important): Meeting rooms, programming and events that bring students/families to campus

    Top Inviting Elements (more than 50% ranked as Very Important):

    • Natural light, comfortable study areas, multi-lingual signage, accessibility for disabled students (Somewhat to Very Important): Quality interior design, outdoor gathering and study spaces

    Classroom Preferences:

    • Traditional classroom – 58% Somewhat Effective

    • Seminar seating – 55% Very Effective

    • Auditorium Seating – 48% Somewhat Effective

    • Outdoor Classroom – 41% Somewhat Effective

    • Online – 55% Somewhat Effective

    • Hybrid – Half online, half in person – 45% Very Effective & 43% Somewhat Effective

    Demographics:

    • Identify as residents (37%), some non profit (13%), some business (10%), and a few Madison College students (8%)

    • Age – Baby boomers (36%), Gen Ex (29%), Millennials (25%

    • Race – 57% White, 27% Black, 11% Latino, 2% Hmong

    • Sex -- More than half female

    • Household Income – Variable

    • Disability -- Variable

    • Level of Education – Bachelors Degree (30%), Master Degree (29%), and 95% received degree in the United States

    • English by far primary language

    Agenda Item: Results Community Meeting #1

    Discussion:

    Melissa reviewed the discussion that took place at the June 14th Community Meeting at the Urban League.

    Issues and Opportunities that rose to the top included these ideas:

    • Expand educational services

    • Support Economic Development

    • Community resources

    • Embrace diversity

    • Our Madison College

    • Complement revitalization

    • Integrate neighborhood

    • Architecture embraces diversity

    • Opportunities for mentoring

    • Job creation

    • Community engagement hub

    Key Elements of the new facility that rose to the top included these ideas:

    • Seamless transition from HS

    • Open for art, culture etc.

    • Student support services

    • Student housing support

    • Childcare

    • Service learning

    • Affordability

    • State of the art technology and services

    • Staff should reflect diversity

    • Student achievement center

    • Career center

    • Flexible class times

    • Day care

    • Outreach/mentoring

    • Student organizations

    Key Potential Partnerships that rose to the top included:

    • Businesses

    • Corporate partners

    • Hospitals & clinics

    • Other schools (high school and colleges)

    • Non profits

    • Neighborhood centers

    The group then discussed the upcoming additional public engagement events. Tina noted that the PMT brainstormed a list of community advocates from organizations and service providers that work with people who would directly benefits from the use of this new campus. These advocates suggested using gift cards as door prizes to boost attendance at upcoming events. Tina asked that the Advisory Council reach out to any businesses they are connected to and ask for donations of grocery or gas gift cards (or purchase gift cards themselves as a tax-deductible donation) as soon as possible. Council members who live in the service area zip codes can host a lawn sign in their front yards promoting Madison College enrollment.

    Scheduled additional outreach events include:

    • Community Market at July 6th at Badger Rock, at the Meadowwood Community Center

    • Meadowwood Community Center on July 12th

    • Allied Drive (date TBD)

    Also:

    • Disability Pride Fest, July 8th

    • Unity Picnic, July 22nd

    • Centro Hispano’s Mercadito, July 30th

    • Africa Fest (?)

    The group then brainstormed and discussed any additional community events where we could do survey and enrollment outreach in the month of July, including:

    • Summer school programs to reach current high school students/potential students (such as the Madison 365 program with the Simpson Street Free Press)

    • Smart Start Session on July 8th at South, with at least 30 recent HS grads to attend

    Agenda Item: Discuss Focus Group

    Discussion:

    Melissa noted that the individual interviews are currently being scheduled for the 9th and 10th of July. 25 invites went out and we are hoping to interview 18-20. 9 have already been scheduled.

    Melissa then asked the Council for input on the formation of the focus groups. The groups themes are currently:

    • Joining Forces for Families

      • a representative from each location plus an Allied Drive community member)

    • Community Center Staff

    • South Madison Business Community

      • Tina will look into Madison College’s membership with the SMBA

    • South Madison Campus Instructors

      • Keith asked that this group include staff as well as instructors

    • South Madison Campus Students

      • (An email advertising the community survey has already gone out to past and current South Madison campus students)

    • Service Organizations

    • Civic Organizations

      • 100 Black Men, Schools of Hope

    • Hmong Residents

    • Government Leaders (City & County)?

      • The group agreed it is important to invite Alders and Supervisors to participate, even if all cannot attend the session

    The Council also suggested reaching out to:

    • Rotary Club

    • Young Black Professionals, Urban League

    • Latino Professional Association

    • United Way

    • Existing Imagine Madison Community Panels

    • Hmong language jobs program at Badger Rock

    • Badger Rock Middle School Community Night on July 14th

    • Latino Academy (hosts classes in late July)

    Agenda Item: Next Meeting

    Discussion:

    The next Council meeting was previously scheduled for July 25th, but there will likely not be any further updates to share at that time. Melissa proposed canceling this July meeting, and moving the August meeting up one week, from the week of the 28th to the week of the 21st. This would be a longer, more in depth meeting over the lunch hour to dive deeper into the survey results. UA will send a save the date to the Advisory Council members.

     

  3. District Board - South meeting minutes

    April 6, 2016
    April 20, 2016
    May 4, 2016


    4/6/16 MINUTES

    A meeting of the Madison Area Technical College District Board was held April 6, 2016, at Madison Area Technical College, 1701 Wright Street, Madison, Wisconsin.

    Board members present: Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, Kelly Crombie, Randy Guttenberg, Arlyn Halvorson, Joseph Hasler, Frances Huntley-Cooper, Shawn Pfaff, Carolyn Stoner and Joel Winn.

    Student representative present: Mareya Mousa.

    Also present: Jack E. Daniels-President; Jon Anderson-Legal Counsel; Turina Bakken, Vice Provost; Tim Casper, Vice President of Institutional Learning & Effectiveness; Keith Cornille, Senior Vice President of Student Development and Success; Charles McDowell, Vice President-Human Resources; Lucía Nuñez, Vice President of Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Mirwais Qader, Chief Information Officer; Mark Thomas, Vice President- Administrative Services; Terry Webb, Provost; and Ellen Hustad-Recording Secretary.

    Others present: Valentina Ahedo, Metro Campus Manager-Downtown and South Madison Campuses; John Alt, Dean-Northern Region; Allison Althof, Office Manager-The Clarion; Jennifer Bakke, Dean-Eastern Region; Mary Bartholomew, Instructor-Arts & Sciences; Dorothy Conduah, Assistant Controller; Jackie Dahlke, Student Program Advisor-Student Life; Sarah Fritz, Director-Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning; Kristin Gebhardt, Interim Assistant Vice President-Human Resources; Jonathan Gramling, Editor-Capital City Hues; Jeff Havens, Instructor-Arts & Sciences; Tom Heaney, Administrator-Institutional Research & Effectiveness; Cary Heyer, Director-Communications & Strategic Marketing; Greg Jones, Dane County Branch-NAACP; Gwen Jones, Administrative Specialist-School of Professional & Continuing Education; Amanda Love, President-Student Senate; Jonny Miranda, Clerical Technician-Downtown Education Center; Laura Osinski, Instructor-Arts & Sciences; Chris Page, Instructor-Adult Basic Education; Marline Pearson, Instructor-Arts & Sciences; William Peters, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity; Jordan Pope, Administrative Planner-Diversity & Community Relations; Sylvia Ramirez, Budget Director; Floyd Rose, President-100 Black Men of Madison; Greg Schulte, Instructor-Applied Arts; Robert Shaul, Instructor-Applied Arts; Janet Stevens, Instructor-Arts & Sciences; Tammy Thayer, Chief Executive Officer-Foundation; Michele Wiberg, Vice President-PMA Securities, Inc.; Nancy Yang, Administrative Planner-Diversity & Community Relations; Ali Zarrinnam, Director-Institutional Research & Effectiveness; and others.

    CALL TO ORDER I

    The meeting was duly noticed and called to order at 5:37 p.m.

    ROUTINE BUSINESS MATTERS II

    Approval of Meeting Minutes II A

    There was a motion by Mr. Pfaff, seconded by Dr. Stoner, to approve the meeting minutes of March 2, 2016, as submitted. Motion approved.

    Public Comments II B

    Ms. Love encouraged the District Board to support the recommendation to increase the student help pay rate.

    NEW BUSINESS III

    Communications III A

    Board Chair’s Report III A 1

    Future Meeting & Event Schedule IIII A 1 a

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper reviewed the schedule for upcoming meetings and College events.

    Student Liaison Report III A 2

    There was no student liaison report.

    College/Campus Announcements III A 3

    Ms. Ahedo, Mr. Alt and Ms. Bakke reported on activities and initiatives occurring at the Madison metro and regional campuses. Mr. Webb and Dr. Cornille reported on recent student successes.

    President’s Report III A 4

    Dr. Daniels reported that the comprehensive visit by the Higher Learning Commission’s accreditation team went well, and recognized Dr. Casper and his assistant Ms. Brudny for their work in preparing the College for the visit.

    Dr. Daniels introduced Dr. Cornille, Dr. Bakken and Ms. Nuñez to present a monitoring report focusing on Board Ends 1.2 (Economy – Communities have the leadership and educational resources to generate and sustain economic base jobs) and 1.3 (College – Leaders are proactive in promoting access and eliminating achievement and skills gaps based on diverse backgrounds and income).

    Monitoring Report: Board Ends 1.2 and 1.3III A 4 a

    Dr. Bakken presented data related to the availability of current and future careers in the Madison College district. Data was also presented related to careers experiencing significant aging in the workforce as well as jobs that require increasing levels of higher education. Efforts by Madison College to address these trends include the creation of a new University Partnership Center and enhanced flexibility and new programming in numerous program areas. Efforts are also being put into place to better prepare students for the future workforce, including career pathways, a new Entrepreneurship Center, and enhancement of core workforce skills such as critical thinking and communication.

    Dr. Cornille presented demographic data related to diversity within the district as well as within student and faculty/staff representation at the College. Ms. Nuñez discussed college efforts to meet the needs of diverse populations. This included the hiring of a vice president to lead equity, inclusion and community efforts at the college as well as the creation of a recruitment office. The College is in the process of developing an Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement Plan that will build on demonstrated successes and include initiatives focused on hiring, procurement and student success and completion.

    Metro Campuses Recommendations III A 4 b

    Dr. Daniels stated that there has been significant dialogue, questions, and many studies conducted over the last several months related to the future of the Downtown Education Center (DTEC) and how to best serve the needs of the south Madison community. Dr. Daniels provided a summary of enrollments at each of the College’s Madison campuses and shared information in response to the many questions that have been raised over the past two years. This included finances, saving the DTEC versus investing in south Madison, rushing a momentous decision, construction myths about the condition of DTEC, current and future enrollments, and the availability of transportation and parking. Dr. Daniels discussed his rationale for recommending that the College have a campus conveniently located within south Madison, stating that the issue is not whether the College saves DTEC or invests in South Madison – the issue is what is in the best interests of the College’s communities and students.

    Dr. Daniels reviewed the options for DTEC that were presented to the Board during a previous meeting: sell the entire site, ground lease the entire site, ground lease a portion of the site, lease a portion of the site to non-profits, or continue to own the entire site.

    Dr. Daniels stated that a presence in south Madison would allow students to earn a degree without having to take courses at another campus. This presence would serve as a catalyst for economic development and partnerships with community-based organizations. Students would be connected to other Madison campuses via convenient access to the Beltline, shuttle service, and the city’s Metro Bus system.

    Dr. Daniels stated that his recommendations take into consideration the College’s mission, which is to serve communities, provide access to programming, and commit to diverse communities.

    Recommendation #1: Ground lease the DTEC Property.

    The District Board shall authorize the College to issue a request for proposals (RFP), within existing regulations and with appropriate contingencies, for a lease with a minimum term of 50 years targeted to commence July 1, 2018. Annual proceeds from the lease will be deposited into the College District’s General Fund and annually budgeted as expenditures. To the extent meeting regulatory requirements necessitates, additional Board authorization will be sought.

    Recommendation #2: Commit to serving the South Madison community.

    The District Board shall authorize the College to enter into negotiations to expand the current Villager Mall facility for a minimum period of two years (July 2017 through June 2019) with the option for additional one-year terms on the lease of the facility.

    The District Board shall also authorize the College to identify and negotiate terms for a purchased or leased facility in South Madison that meets the instructional and student support needs previously identified by the College. The College shall also identify the associated financial resources for such a facility.

    Dr. Daniels reminded the District Board of student and community forums that have been scheduled to further discuss and receive input related to the recommendations. The District Board is scheduled to vote on the two recommendations at their meeting on May 4, 2016

    Action Items III B

    Capital Projects Borrowing III B 1

    Resolution Awarding the Sale of $4,100,000 General Obligation Promissory Notes, Series 2015-16E III B 1 a

    On March 2, 2016, the District Board authorized the sale of $4,100,000 of General Obligation Promissory Notes for the public purpose of the acquisition of movable equipment and technology costing $500 or more per unit or set ($2,600,000) and for the purpose of paying the cost of building remodeling and improvement projects ($1,500,000).

    Ms. Wiberg reported that a total of five bids were submitted, with the winning bid coming from Fidelity Capital Markets with a final true interest cost of 1.5076 percent. Standard & Poor’s affirmed the College’s AAA rating as part of the sale process. Ms. Wiberg recommended that the District Board adopt a resolution awarding the sale to Fidelity Capital Markets.

    There was a motion by Mr. Halvorson, seconded by Dr. Stoner, to adopt the Resolution Awarding the Sale of $4,100,000 General Obligation Promissory Notes, Series 2015-16E. Motion approved.

    Approval of External Audit Services III B 2

    Mr. Thomas stated that the College participated in a joint Request for Proposal (RFP) process with a group that included eight other technical college districts, most of their foundations, and the Wisconsin Technical College Employee Benefits Consortium. The purpose of the RFP was to identify an independent certified public accountant to conduct annual audits of the District’s financial statements. Based on an evaluation of the six proposals that were received, it was being recommended that a five-year contract be awarded to Clifton Larson Allen, LLP, for audits covering fiscal years ending June 30, 2016, through 2020.

    There was a motion by Mr. Hasler, seconded by Mr. Guttenberg, to accept the proposal and award Clifton Larson Allen, LLP, the audit engagement for Madison College for the next five years as proposed. Motion approved.

    Fiscal Year 2015-16 Budget Amendment III B 3

    Mr. Thomas presented proposed adjustments to the FY2015-16 budget in the General, Special Revenue Aidable, Special Revenue Non-Aidable, Capital, Debt Service, Enterprise and Internal Service funds. Mr. Thomas noted that this amendment required a two-thirds majority vote.

    There was a motion by Ms. Bidar-Sielaff, seconded by Dr. Stoner, to approve the budget modifications for FY2015-16. All voted in favor. Motion approved.

    Fiscal Year 2016-17 Student Help Pay Rate III B 4

    Mr. Thomas stated that, based on an analysis of similar occupations using Dane County and statewide data, the College is recommending the student pay rate of $9.25 per hour be increased to $9.35 per hour for FY2016-17, with a $1.00 per hour shift differential.

    Students are employed throughout the College District as tutors, clerical support, mailroom assistants, help desk assistants, food service workers, security staff, and numerous other positions. The College pays approximately 650 students as student help or Federal Work Study.

    There was a motion by Mr. Pfaff, seconded by Mr. Kelly, to approve raising the hourly wage rate from $9.25 to $9.35 per hour with a one dollar ($1.00) per hour shift differential for hours worked consistent with other non-exempt college employees for student help and College Work Study for Fiscal Year 2016-17.

    Motion approved.

    Fiscal Year 2016-17 Proposed Budget III B 5

    Mr. Thomas and Ms. Ramirez presented information related to the proposed FY2016-17 budget. This included revenue and expenditure estimates, new initiatives included in the budget, tax levy and mill rates, and fund balance estimate. The proposed budget reflects a total mill rate of 0.98148 and a tax levy increase of 9.01 percent.

    If approved by the District Board, a public hearing will be conducted on May 4, 2016, followed by final Board approval on June 1, 2016.

    There was a motion by Mr. Hasler, seconded by Ms. Bidar-Sielaff, to approve taking the proposed Fiscal Year 2016-17 budget to public hearing and establish the date, time, and place for the public hearing as May 4, 2016, at 5:30 p.m. in room 122 of the Madison Area Technical College Truax Campus Administration Building, 1701 Wright Street, Madison. Motion approved.

    Consent Agenda Items III B 6

    Monitoring Report: Board Ends 1.2 and 1.3 III B 6 a

    General fund financial report as of February 29, 2016 III B 6 b

    Request for proposals/request for bids/sole sources III B 6 c

    Supplier payments greater than or equal to $2,500 and schedule of checks issued for the period February 16, 2016, through March 15, 2016 III B 6 d

    Employment of personnel III B 6 e

    Resignations and separations III B 6 f

    There was a motion by Ms. Bidar-Sielaff, seconded by Dr. Stoner, to approve Consent Agenda items III.B.6.a. through f. as submitted. Motion approved.

    ADJOURNMENTV

    There was a motion by Mr. Pfaff, seconded by Mr. Halvorson, to adjourn. Motion approved.

    The meeting adjourned at 7:45 p.m.

    ____________________________________
    Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, Secretary


    April 20, 2016

     

    April 13, 2016


    MEETING NOTICE

     

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Madison Area Technical College District Board will meet in open session at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, 2016, in Room B3243/3253, Madison Area Technical College Truax Campus, 1701 Wright Street, Madison, to receive community input related to metro campus recommendations:

    RECOMMENDATION 1: Ground lease the Downtown Education Center (DTEC) property – The District Board shall authorize the College to issue a request for proposals (RFP), within existing regulations and with appropriate contingencies, for a lease with a minimum term of 50 years targeted to commence July 1, 2018. Annual proceeds from the lease will be deposited into the College District’s General Fund and annually budgeted as expenditures. To the extent meeting regulatory requirements necessitates additional Board authorization it will be sought.

    RECOMMENDATION 2: Commit to serving the South Madison community – The District Board shall authorize the College to enter into negotiations to expand the current Villager Mall facility for a minimum period of 2 years (July 2017 through June 2019) with the option for additional one-year terms on the lease of the facility.

    The District Board shall also authorize the College to identify and negotiate terms for a purchased or leased facility in South Madison that meets the instructional and student support needs previously identified by the College. The College shall also identify the associated financial resources for such a facility.

    cc: News Media
    Madison College Board
    Legal Counsel
    Administrative Staff
    Full-Time Faculty/ESP Local 243
    Part-Time Faculty Local 6100

     


    May 4, 2016

    A public hearing meeting of the Madison Area Technical College District Board was held May 4, 2016, at Madison Area Technical College, 1701 Wright Street, Madison, Wisconsin.

    Board members present: Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, Kelly Crombie, Randy Guttenberg, Arlyn Halvorson, Joseph Hasler, Frances Huntley-Cooper, Shawn Pfaff, Carolyn Stoner and Joel Winn.

    Student representative present: Mareya Mousa.

    Also present: Jack E. Daniels-President; Jon Anderson-Legal Counsel; Turina Bakken, Vice Provost; Tim Casper, Vice President of Institutional Learning & Effectiveness; Keith Cornille, Senior Vice President of Student Development & Success; Charles McDowell, Vice President-Human Resources; Lucía Nuñez, Vice President of Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Mirwais Qader, Chief Information Officer; Mark Thomas, Vice President- Administrative Services; Terry Webb, Provost; and, Ellen Hustad-Recording Secretary.

    Others present: José Rea-South Madison; Dr. Ruben Anthony-Urban League of Greater Madison; Gene DeVitt-Mansion Hill Neighborhood Association; Sandy Fuller-Citizen; Bob Fuller-Citizen; Romilia Schweter-Family Resource Center of Dane County; Jose Bruno-Student; Steve Medall-Instructor, Arts & Sciences; Noel Radomski-Citizen; Denise DeMarb-Madison District 16 Alder; Dean Loumos-Citizen; Amanda Love-Student Senate; Mayra Medrano-Dane County Latino Chamber of Commerce; Luis Montoto-La Movida; Greg Jones-Dane County NAACP; Gail Ford-Delta Sigma Theta Madison Alumni Chapter; Delisa Scott-Madison College Counselor; Julia Arata-Fratta-City of Fitchburg Alder Candidate; Sheri Carter-Madison District 14 Alder; Jessica Grimes-Student; Edward Robinson-Citizen; Rick Poole-Student; Ken Taylor- Wisconsin Council on Children and Families; Mary Bartholomew-Instructor; Karen Coller- Centro Hispano; Sarah Useche-Simpson Street Free Press; Jonathan Barry-Citizen; Fred Mohs- Citizen; Mario Garcia Sierra-Citizen; Veronica Lazo-UNIDOS Against Domestic Violence; Earnestine Moss-Citizen; William Peters-Citizen; Oscar Mireles-Citizen; Louise Robbins- Citizen; Patrick Robbins-Citizen; Joel Nigh-Citizen; Franny Ingebritson-Capitol Neighborhoods, Inc.; Isadore Knox-South Metro Planning Council; Derrick Smith-Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity; Floyd Rose-100 Black Men of Madison, Inc.; Kaleem Caire-Citizen; Tierra Simmons-High School Student; Kiera Smith Noal-High School Student; Wesley Sparkman-Citizen; Marline Pearson-Instructor, Arts & Sciences; Michael Verveer-City of Madison Common Council; Renny Mitchell-Luft-Citizen; Louise Lattarell-Citizen; and, others.

    CALL TO ORDER I

    The public hearing was duly noticed and called to order at 5:30 p.m.

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper stated that the hearing provides an opportunity for public comments related to the proposed FY2016-17 budget, as approved by the Madison College District Board on April 6, 2016.

    Highlights of the FY2016-17 Budget II

    Madison College Budget Director Sylvia Ramirez provided highlights of the Madison College District FY2016-17 budget.

    Comments from the Public III

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper confirmed that there were no requests for public comment.

    Close of Public Hearing IV

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper stated that the FY2016-17 budget would be considered for adoption at the June 1, 2016, meeting.

    The public hearing adjourned at 5:37 p.m.


    ____________________________________
    Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, Secretary


    A meeting of the Madison Area Technical College District Board was held May 4, 2016, at Madison Area Technical College, 1701 Wright Street, Madison, Wisconsin.

    Board members present: Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, Kelly Crombie, Randy Guttenberg, Arlyn Halvorson, Joseph Hasler, Frances Huntley-Cooper, Shawn Pfaff, Carolyn Stoner and Joel Winn.

    Student representative present: Mareya Mousa.

    Also present: Jack E. Daniels-President; Jon Anderson-Legal Counsel; Turina Bakken, Vice Provost; Tim Casper, Vice President of Institutional Learning & Effectiveness; Keith Cornille, Senior Vice President of Student Development & Success; Charles McDowell, Vice President-Human Resources; Lucía Nuñez, Vice President of Equity, Inclusion and Community Engagement; Mirwais Qader, Chief Information Officer; Mark Thomas, Vice President- Administrative Services; Terry Webb, Provost; and, Ellen Hustad-Recording Secretary.

    Others present: José Rea-South Madison; Dr. Ruben Anthony-Urban League of Greater Madison; Gene DeVitt-Mansion Hill Neighborhood Association; Sandy Fuller-Citizen; Bob Fuller-Citizen; Romilia Schweter-Family Resource Center of Dane County; Jose Bruno-Student; Steve Medall-Instructor, Arts & Sciences; Noel Radomski-Citizen; Denise DeMarb-Madison District 16 Alder; Dean Loumos-Citizen; Amanda Love-Student Senate; Mayra Medrano-Dane County Latino Chamber of Commerce; Luis Montoto-La Movida; Greg Jones-Dane County NAACP; Gail Ford-Delta Sigma Theta Madison Alumni Chapter; Delisa Scott-Madison College Counselor; Julia Arata-Fratta-City of Fitchburg Alder Candidate; Sheri Carter-Madison District 14 Alder; Jessica Grimes-Student; Edward Robinson-Citizen; Rick Poole-Student; Ken Taylor- Wisconsin Council on Children and Families; Mary Bartholomew-Instructor; Karen Coller- Centro Hispano; Sarah Useche-Simpson Street Free Press; Jonathan Barry-Citizen; Fred Mohs- Citizen; Mario Garcia Sierra-Citizen; Veronica Lazo-UNIDOS Against Domestic Violence;

    Earnestine Moss-Citizen; William Peters-Citizen; Oscar Mireles-Citizen; Louise Robbins- Citizen; Patrick Robbins-Citizen; Joel Nigh- Citizen; Franny Ingebritson-Capitol Neighborhoods, Inc.; Isadore Knox-South Metro Planning Council; Derrick Smith-Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity; Floyd Rose-100 Black Men of Madison, Inc.; Kaleem Caire-Citizen; Tierra Simmons-High School Student; Kiera Smith Noal-High School Student; Wesley Sparkman- Citizen; Marline Pearson-Instructor, Arts & Sciences; Michael Verveer-City of Madison Common Council; Renny Mitchell-Luft-Citizen; Louise Lattarell-Citizen; and, others.

    CALL TO ORDER I

    The meeting was duly noticed and called to order at 5:37 p.m.

    ROUTINE BUSINESS MATTERS II

    Approval of Meeting Minutes II A

    There was a motion by Ms. Bidar-Sielaff, seconded by Dr. Stoner, to approve the meeting minutes of April 6, 2016, as submitted. Motion approved.

    Public Comments II B

    Madison College faculty, staff and students, and members from the community spoke in support for the Downtown Education Center. The location’s access to public transportation and close proximity to the state capital, art community, and the University of Wisconsin were cited as strong considerations for keeping the property. The general condition of the Downtown Education Center and cost estimates to upgrade were questioned, as well as the need for a new campus in south Madison.

    Madison College faculty, staff and students, and members from the community spoke in support of enhancing the College’s presence in south Madison. It was noted that this area of the city has historically experienced low educational attainment, limited job opportunities, and high unemployment. A comprehensive campus in south Madison would provide much needed access to education, job training, and pathways to opportunities for underserved populations.

    Ms. Huntley Cooper read a letter from the Madison Police Department, expressing support for the South Madison Campus initiative.

    Ms. Mousa shared a summary of student comments from the forums that occurred at Truax, Downtown, and South Madison campuses.

    NEW BUSINESS III

    Information Items III A

    Student Senate Presentation: FY2015-16 Accomplishments and Current Initiatives III A 1

    FY2015-16 Student Senate president Amanda Love referred to information that was shared related to the Senate’s 2015-16 accomplishments and planned initiatives for 2016-17.

    Communications III B

    Board Chair’s Report III B 1

    Appointment of Ad Hoc Nominations Committee III B 1 a

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper reported that she appointed Mr. Guttenberg, Dr. Stoner, and Mr. Winn to the 2016-17 Ad Hoc Nominations Committee. The committee is scheduled to present their officer recommendations at the June 1, 2016, meeting.

    Future Meeting & Event Schedule III B 1 b

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper reviewed the schedule for upcoming meetings and College events.

    Student Liaison Report III B 2

    There was no student liaison report.

    President’s Report III B 3

    Dr. Daniels introduced Kristin Rolling, the new Executive Assistant to the President and District Board, stating she was selected after an extensive search. Ms. Rolling is replacing Ms. Hustad, who is retiring June 3, 2016.

    Dr. Daniels reported that Madison College will be signing two articulation agreements with Edgewood College next week. One is an Honors Program Agreement, and the other is a Liberal Arts Transfer Agreement.

    Action Items III C

    Madison Metropolitan Campuses III C 1

    Dr. Daniels provided an overview of the process that led to the development of the recommendations for the Downtown Education Center and the South Madison Campus, including an analysis of demographics, facilities, statutes, finances, and public forums.

    Dr. Daniels stated that the changes being considered by the Board reflect the mission of Madison College and will ensure that the College is serving underserved populations in the district.

    Dr. Daniels requested that the Board vote on the two recommendations as they were noticed.

    There was a motion by Mr. Hasler, seconded by Mr. Pfaff, to approve the two recommendations as presented by Dr. Daniels. Ms. Huntley-Cooper read the recommendations:

    RECOMMENDATION 1: Ground lease the Downtown Education Center (DTEC) property – The District Board shall authorize the College to issue a request for proposals (RFP), within existing regulations and with appropriate contingencies, for a lease with a minimum term of 50 years targeted to commence July 1, 2018. Annual proceeds from the lease will be deposited into the College District’s General Fund and annually budgeted as expenditures. To the extent meeting regulatory requirements necessitates additional Board authorization it will be sought.

    RECOMMENDATION 2: Commit to serving the South Madison community – The District Board shall authorize the College to enter into negotiations to expand the current Villager Mall facility for a minimum period of 2 years (July 2017 through June 2019) with the option for additional one-year terms on the lease of the facility.

    The District Board shall also authorize the College to identify and negotiate terms for a purchased or leased facility in South Madison that meets the instructional and student support needs previously identified by the College. The College shall also identify the associated financial resources for such a facility.

    Mr. Hasler expressed support for the recommendations, stating that his previous concerns have been addressed and he is optimistic about a new presence in South Madison.

    Ms. Bidar-Sielaff suggested a friendly amendment to the original motion to include the following statetment:

    And further that the District Board shall be kept reasonably informed of Administrative actions relative to the implementation of the Metro-Campus recommendations, particularly in regard to location, programs, and operations, and further that the District Board approval be obtained as to the lease of any real property by the College to another party, or the lease, purchase, or other acquisition of real property by the College in regard to the implementation of the Metro- Campus recommendations.

    Mr. Hasler and Mr. Pfaff accepted the friendly amendment to their original motion.

    Mr. Pfaff stated that the proposed changes represent a new era of access to education. He also thanked Dr. Daniels for moving the process forward and being a change-agent.

    Mr. Guttenberg stated that the proposed changes will ensure that the College is being fiscally responsible and maintaining strong programs in an environment of shrinking resources.

    Mr. Halvorson stated he believes DTEC provides value to the College, and that a stronger College presence is needed in South Madison.

    Mr. Hasler stated that the process of arriving at the proposed changes has been a transparent one.

    Ms. Mousa stated that she asked several South Campus students why they had not attended public forums about the proposed changes. The most common answers were a lack of access to child care, transportation barriers, and their status as English language learners.

    Dr. Stoner stated that after 11 years as a Board member, she is most proud of tonight’s vote.

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper thanked community members for attending the meeting and providing their input. She also thanked Dr. Daniels for bringing a new perspective to the College.

    Mr. Crombie thanked Dr. Daniels and his staff for their work in researching the Metro- Campus options. He stated that he thinks the proposed changes present a sustainable plan for the College’s future.

    Ms. Huntley-Cooper determined that the Board was ready to vote on the original motion with the included friendly amendment.

    The motion by Mr. Hasler and Mr. Pfaff, including amendment proposed by Ms. Bidar-Sielaff, was approved unanimously.

    Capital Projects Borrowing III C 2

    Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of Not to Exceed $4,100,000 General Obligation Promissory Notes Series 2015-16F; and Setting the Sale Therefor III B 1 a

    Mr. Thomas stated that the District Board was being asked to approve a resolution totaling $4,100,000, which is the authorization to begin the borrow process. These funds would be used for $1,500,000 in building remodeling and improvement projects and $2,600,000 for the acquisition of movable equipment and technology. If approved by the District Board, a resolution will be presented at the June 1, 2016, meeting to award the sale of the bonds to the winning bidder from the bidding process.

    There was a motion by Mr. Winn, seconded by Mr. Pfaff, to adopt the Resolution Authorizing the Issuance of not to Exceed $4,100,000 General Obligation Promissory Notes, Series 2015-16F; and Setting the Sale Therefor. Motion approved.

    Consent Agenda Items III C 3

    General fund financial report as of March 31, 2016 III C 3 a

    Quarterly investment report as of March 31, 2016 III C 3 b

    Request for proposals/request for bids/sole sources III C 3 c

    Supplier payments greater than or equal to $2,500 and schedule of checks issued for the period March 16, 2016, through April 15, 2016 III C 3 d

    38.14 contracts for the period January through March 2016 III C 3 e

    Employment of personnel III 3 C f

    Mr. Crombie requested separation of agenda item III.C.3.b, “Quarterly investment report as of March 31, 2016.”

    There was a motion by Dr. Stoner, seconded by Ms. Bidar-Sielaff, to approve Consent Agenda items III.C.3.a, c, d, e, and f, as submitted. Motion approved.

    Mr. Crombie encouraged the college to consider investing with local financial institutions when possible.

    There was a motion by Mr. Crombie, seconded by Mr. Pfaff, to approve Consent Agenda item III.C.3.b. as submitted. Motion approved.

    ADJOURNMENT V

    There was a motion by Mr. Pfaff, seconded by Dr. Stoner, to adjourn. Motion approved.

    The meeting adjourned at 9:24 p.m.


    ____________________________________
    Shiva Bidar-Sielaff, Secretary

  4. Metro Campus Recommendations

    Metro Campus Recommendations, April 6, 2016
    President Jack E. Daniels III Recommendation Remarks, April 6, 2016


    Metro Campus Recommendation

    Madison College Board of Trustees Board Meeting

    April 6, 2016

    Overview

    • Introductory Data Analysis

    • Finances

    • DTEC vs. South Madison – Reality?

    • Timeliness of Decisions

    • Construction Issues

    • Enrollment Concerns

    • Transportation Issues

    • Why South Madison Initiative?

    • Options Considered

    • Recommendations


    If you have questions or require access to the full document that includes current campus demographics, please contact Kristin Rolling in the Madison College President's Office at (608) 246-6677

     

    South Madison - Need

    • The area of South Madison has numerous census blocks where multiple barriers to opportunities thresholds are exceeded.
      (Capital Area Regional Planning Commission, 2014)

    • South Madison is one of the densest areas of poverty in the College District.

    • Nearly 50% of the adult population 25 years of age and older has an education level between some high school and some college, compared to 31% for the entire city of Madison.
      (Info. on barriers to opportunity is at: www.capitalregionscrpg.org/?p=1399)

    Current Programming and Services

    • 44% of student FTEs in non-degree credit programs in FY15

    • No ability to complete a degree at South Campus

    • No student services related to student achievement and retention

    Future Programming and Services

    • General education/college transfer; developmental education (ABE/GED/ESL); non-credit, business-related courses

    • Enrollment services, academic advising, testing center, library and tutoring services, counseling, career and employment services, student life programming

    • Space for: classrooms and labs; library and tutoring space; faculty and staff offices; student service operations; meeting rooms; and student lounge

    South Madison Area Comprehensive Campus Attributes

    • Provide ability for students to earn a degree without taking courses elsewhere

    • Serve as catalyst for economic development; partner with community-based organizations

    • Reduce student apprehension of attending Truax

    • Connect to other Metro campuses via shuttle service

    • Accessible via the Beltline (Hwys 12&14) and Metro Bus

      • Attractive to students in west Madison metro area


    Downtown Education Center

    • 168,000 sq. ft. of programmable space

    • Hosts degree credit and non-degree credit programs

    Rehabilitation Costs

    • $14-$19 million in needed maintenance work

    • $10-$15 million to renovate classrooms and labs

    • Building Use and Programming

    • 25% vacant space due to program re-location to new facilities at the Truax Campus. Avg. room utilization of 21% at DTEC in FY15.

    • Headcount enrollment decline of 25% between FY11-FY15 due in part to health programming moving to new facilities at Truax.

    • 40% decline in student FTE between FY11 and FY15.

    • FY18 Cosmetology moving to Truax vacates an additional 5,000 sq. ft.

    • 24% of student FTEs in non-degree programming in FY15.

    • Very limited course enrollment of UW students at DTEC (>0.5%)

    • Programs that can be completed solely at DTEC: early childhood education, human services, animation, college transfer associate degree, college transfer-art.

    Fixed Costs

    • FY15 - $909,000

    • FY15 Fixed Costs per FTE student - $1,161/student

     


    Recommendations

    Recommendation 1 - Downtown

    RECOMMENDATION 1: Ground lease the DTEC property.

    • The District Board shall authorize the College to issue a request for proposals (RFP), within existing regulations and with appropriate contingencies, for a lease with a minimum term of 50 years targeted to commence July 1, 2018. Annual proceeds from the lease will be deposited into the College District’s General Fund and annually budgeted as expenditures. To the extent meeting regulatory requirements necessitates additional Board authorization it will be sought.

    Recommendation 2 – South Madison

    RECOMMENDATION 2: Commit to serving the South Madison community.

    • The District Board shall authorize the College to enter into negotiations to expand the current Villager Mall facility for a minimum period of 2 years (July 2017 through June 2019) with the option for additional one- year terms on the lease of the facility.

    • The District Board shall also authorize the College to identify and negotiate terms for a purchased or leased facility in South Madison that meets the instructional and student support needs previously identified by the College. The College shall also identify the associated financial resources for such a facility.


    Metro Facilities Decision Timeline

    • April 12, 2016

      • Student Forum
        Downtown Education Center, Room D240, 3:00 – 4:00 PM

      • Community Forum
        Downtown Education Center, Room D240, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

    • April 13, 2016

      • Student Forum
        Truax, Room C2402, 2:00 – 3:30 PM

    • April 13, 2016

      • Community Forum
        Fountain of Life Church, Sanctuary Room, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

    • April 20, 2016

      • Special Board Meeting/Public Commenton
        Metro Campus Recommendation, Truax Main Building B3243/B3253, 4:30 – 6:30 PM

    • May 4, 2016

      • Board Decision, Truax Main Building B3243,B3253, 5:30 PM

     


    President Jack E. Daniels III Recommendation

    Madison Area Technical College Board Presentation
    Metro Campuses Recommendation

    April 6, 2016

    For nearly the last 2 years, the College has reviewed the campuses that comprise the Metro Madison Campuses. As you will hear in May, we are bringing to you our recommendation on the “new” west campus, approximately 84,000 sq. ft. less than the current west campus. This campus will serve primarily a Continuing Education population with a credit generating population being served during the day. I remind you that the evening is the most opportune time for CE.

    Commercial Avenue campus, more specifically its B building, has and continues to be renovated to meet the needs of our Construction Program and apprenticeship.

    Truax, the flagship campus, and that terminology based on programs, students and employees, serves nearly 16,107 credit students amounting to 5675.2 FTES. With its Human and Protective Services and School of Health buildings, these facilities are now hosting programs that were elsewhere in the district 3 years ago. Additionally, the barber- cosmetology program at DTEC is being consolidated with its companion program at Truax in the fall, 2017.

    DTEC serves 2,254 credit headcount students and 3,953 non-credit students, a decline over the last 5 years of the total enrollment at DTEC of 25%. As it relates to the decline in credit FTES, it represents a decline of 474 FTES equaling 44%.

    South Campus serves 485 credit headcount students and 598 non-credit students a decline over the last 5 years of nearly 45% in the total enrollment at South Campus. As it relates to the decline in credit FTES, it represents a decline of 54 FTES. This amounts to a decline of 48%.

    Summarizing, there are 2,254 degree credit students at DTEC compared to 3,765 students taking non-degree classes. That is nearly more a 2 to 1 ratio of non-credit to credit students. At South 168 students are taking credit classes and 598 students in non-credit classes resulting in a little more than a 1 to 1 ratio of non-credit to credit students.

    Over the last few months there have been many studies, related questions, and dialogue on what to do with DTEC, if anything, and how we can better serve the most impoverished area in Madison – and should we?

    We recognize that any recommendation leading to a decision must be based in data. As difficult as it may be to extract the emotion from the discussion, data allows us to do that as our focus becomes just that – focused.

    I have entertained many questions over these past two years – and need to answer them in order for the picture you are seeing is clear.

    FINANCES

    MATC, as we have expressed in past meetings, has experienced radical shifts in its funding since 2011. Limited levy authority and shifting of property tax resulting in the College being supported by the state nearly 50% of its operational costs. MATC’s budget is about 85% personnel. We have approximately 2,500 employees of which 1,200 are Full-time. Operating costs at all 5 metro campuses annually is $9.4 million. Closing West will result in an operational savings of $1.9 million; coupled with the opening of a “new” west campus, the net savings is $1.45 million. There are also considerations for reducing operational costs which I will expand on later this evening.

    One author has remarked that there is no plan to address the structural deficit. We are addressing the issues of structural deficits through enhanced management of schedules and load, filing strategically faculty and staff positions, restructuring tasks and becoming more flexible – which will impact who we hire; and maintaining the integrity of the curriculum. We are securing operational savings from the closing of campuses. We are currently working on metrics that will inform our long-term financial plan that will result in a continued sustainable budget, as evidenced by the College’s current triple A Bond rating, for the next few years. This plan will be vetted through our shared governance process prior to presenting to the Board. Some, as one author stated, will say we are doing little and, by not hiring FT faculty we will seriously limit the ability of the College to accomplish the personnel-intensive work it needs to do. Contrary, we look at opportunities and how best to optimize our funding and personnel – existing and new. The only way, within the public context, to increase funding is through generation of Full-time equivalent students (FTES). The college has worked well for 100 years for the majority population; however, the population consisting of people of color and other underrepresented populations do not take full advantage of Madison College, nor have we made the consistent efforts to meet those needs – which is a major part of our mission. We have restructured our recruiting efforts and as we stand here today, our applications are up 5.2% from this point in time last year and admissions are up 13% from this point in time last year and the inroads we have made will continue. Former Chancellor Wiley in his comments indicated that MATC has become a place where students can receive their first two years and then move on to UW or other universities. This was true during his tenure as well as today as the figures earlier indicated. In fact, the figures that the former Chancellor noted were for MATC as a whole and not the individual campuses as data presented through another medium implied. I would also emphasize, as the data suggests, transfer isn’t place-bound. It is dependent on where the courses are and who teaches them. And in an ever-changing academic environment, not dissimilar to what we are experiencing, on-line, electronically. A side data point, using the change in FTES from 2011-2015, we have seen an increase of 52% of students taking a course completely on-line, a 23% increase in hybrid courses, 36% increase in accelerated courses, and a decline of 14% for land-based or in person classes.

    One author indicated the millions of dollars are necessary for a new south and a west side presence. Not so. The new west is approximately $450,000 annually and in five years $2.4 million. A new south could result in an acquisition and buildout of approximately $7-8 million with annual operating costs of $500,000. Yet, if leased, our annual operating outlay will be $1.22 million with a lower build-out of $3.8 million for a facility of approximately 50,000 sq. ft. Quite frankly, we save money for investment in students by divesting in DTEC.

    EITHER SAVE DTEC OR INVEST IN SOUTH MADISON

    The issue for me is either - do we remain in a facility that on January 28, 1966 it was reported in the State Journal Editorial that “It’s been a long and searching discussion with honest concern on all sides. And the time has come to make a decision: Central High School should be closed”. “postponing it [a decision] will hamstring sound planning in Madison for education.” The editorial, in 1966 stated that “Central’s physical plant is obsolete and incapable of being brought up to standard.” “The primary issue is what will best serve the future interests of Madison’s children”. Though the school age population in 1966 near downtown was declining, the editorial continued to state that those students deserve a “First- Class” high school. “Not only good teachers, but comfortable classrooms, modern science and language laboratories, adequate gyms, excellent library facilities, generous areas for outdoor sports”. “Madison wants to assure that the same fine facilities provided at other Madison high schools . . . “. And last, the indication was that the vocational school would take it over and have expanded opportunities for adult education. The issue is Mission. The issue is having a facility conducive to teaching and learning. The issue is having programs that meet the needs of Madisonians who have not accessed the college. The issue is not save DTEC or Invest in South Madison. The issue here as it was in 1966, focuses on what is in the best interests of our communities and students. The investment is in people – students. And yes, to ensure that we are investing we need to be where students can invest in themselves. No one has stated that solving poverty and racial disparities is as simple as siting a building. As every learned social scientist knows, there are many external factors that impact one’s accessibility or perceived accessibility – among them are a hostile environment vs. a “warm and inviting” environment, an environment wherein students aren’t overwhelmed because they have never been placed in that environment, transportation, family-living wages, housing, food – the list goes on.

    RUSH OF DEADLINE FOR SUCH A MOMENTOUS DECISION

    I have been here nearly 3 years – 2/3rd of my tenure has been about how we serve this community and how does the college free itself from the financial straits due to decisions that were out of our hands. That’s not rush. It’s been 50 years since that editorial – that’s not rush. The condition of DTEC and the $ that it costs to renovate has been identified over years. That’s not rush. On a practical side – the College can’t wait any longer to make a decision.

    $900,000 in operational costs for an aged, obsolete, and unadaptable building is not good use of the college’s funds, taxpayer’s funds. With new standards for buildings, energy efficient buildings, I would think that taxpayers across our district would want those dollars spent in a way to meet the goals of students to be able to transfer or gain employable skills that lead to living wage jobs. I would think that taxpayers would want us to be prudent not just with real property assets, but the dollars that have entrusted us to spend effectively and efficiently and serve our communities.

    CONSTRUCTION MYTHS

    Does DTEC need a $30 million renovation? I have received comments that nothing is wrong with DTEC. We have good condition classrooms, modern teaching technology, and appropriately configured programs. When compared with our other facilities, should not all of our facilities be equal in their ability to be conducive to teaching. I am a teacher. I can teach anywhere. But I want to teach in an environment that is technologically sound, where students feel secure amidst a welcoming environment, that is environmentally appropriate, and that the supplemental spaces necessary for retention and persistence are much more than adequate. $15 million for infrastructure; $15 million for classroom and supplemental space upgrade. Five different contractors/architects over a period of 6 years have reviewed this building. If the college doesn’t have the money to “put DTEC” in order, but can establish a new site that serves our communities better for less operational and initial outlay cost should we not move in this direction?

    ENROLLMENT

    When the economy seems to be in 4th gear, rolling along, our enrollments in 2 year colleges dip. Madison College is no exception, though our dip isn’t as steep as some of our colleague institutions across the state. Nevertheless, the dip is across the district. With the building of the HPS and Health buildings at Truax, programs previously located at West and DTEC have now moved to Truax. In the fall of 2017, cosmetology will be consolidated into one location at Truax. Part of the decline can be attributed to the changing programs, part can be attributed to our changed economic condition – however, there is an overall decline that is representative of what students can attain at DTEC in addition to a facility that quite frankly, is not up to Madison College standards and what the public expects from Madison College. Regardless of this fact, having a facility with a functional instructional space utilization vacancy level of about 67% wherein those current programs can find homes in metro Madison elsewhere, it is not prudent to maintain a facility, regardless of its ownership, and continue to repair and spend precious operational funds that can go to other entities and for students in the MATC District. Time and time over, there have been attempts to grow programming that would relate to increased enrollment, but time and time again, those attempts have been failures. DTEC will see, as is expected, some enrollment increases due to the closing of West, however, the entire picture of enrollment must also been seen in the context of the District. As we look at DTEC and the downtown area, there has been comments made that if 4,000 young people are moving downtown (Zip 53703), why would we leave? 65% of the population living in the downtown area have an Associate Degree or higher with 60% of that number having a Bachelors or higher. It is also been presented in several venues that housing costs, rental and condos, is high when compared against other areas in the city - indicating those that have relatively high incomes are moving to the central city or have parents who can afford higher rents. 35% of the downtown population according to DMI are EPIC employees. In summary, these new residents are either enrolled at UW or have already attained degrees and other credentials beyond what our college offers and are employed at salaries above the median for the city.

    HONEST TALK ON TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING

    Yes, let’s have an honest discussion. One contingent of individuals have stated that DTEC is the only MATC campus easily accessible via public transportation. That is dependent on the students’ standpoint. Some may state that where they originate from, Truax is accessible as is south and west and Commercial Avenue in addition to DTEC. But let’s just look at DTEC. There are 23 bus lines that start and end in downtown. Of those, 6 have all day service, 2 run only off peak and 15 run only during peak time. Off peak being 9-3pm and peak running 6- 9am and 3-7pm. If your classes don’t fall between those times peak and off peak times, the likelihood of you taking the bus significantly drops. On the contrary, if the location is on the Park Street Corridor, let’s say near Park and Badger Road (Beltline) 5 bus lines come into the terminal every day, all day and 4 during peak and on-peak hours. Those lines come into the bus terminus at Badger Road and Park from South Broadway and from West Madison as well and daily, throughout the day. I note the west Madison area especially around Mckee, Raymond Rd, McKenna, and Schroeder Rd bounded by Gammon where there is an increased area of poverty. The same could be said for transportation accessibility from Allied Dr and points eastward and west of the Beltline. And, parking. Fact – limited parking at DTEC. Fact – anywhere a facility is located in our district –parking, accessibility will be high on the list for determining sites.

    Now, let me add one other question to be answered, WHY SOUTH?

    I have consistently talked about the need to serve the South Community. Not just the Park Street Corridor, but the impoverished areas that range from South of the Beltline from Stoughton Road to the Park Street Corridor to the Town of Madison to Meadow Wood and bordering on Gammon. A map is worth a thousand words.

    This map represents concentrated Barriers to Opportunity in Dane County. The colors represent the variables that define the opportunity scale. Those are:

    1. Segregation

    2. Poverty

    3. Language Barriers

    4. Mobility Limitations

    5. Single-parent

    6. Housing Costs Burden

    7. Education Barriers

    8. Youth Concentration

    9. Unemployment

    10. Food Stamps

     

    The more variables in a certain section, the darker the color representing the barriers to opportunity. (0= yellow; 1= gold; 2-3=orange; 4-5=bronze; 6-7=maroon) Are there more areas than in the south – Yes, most prominently in Northpoint and continued North along Packers Avenue – where Truax’s closeness demands greater work and collaborative work in that area.

     

    The other areas of poverty is in the south as indicated by the capital area regional planning commission and recognized by government, educational, social service and citizen groups. Very few students from this south area attend DTEC for degree credit and is declining. In spring 2015-16, 69 students from those zip codes in the south in the areas indicated on the map attended DTEC for credit; 54 for continuing education and 58 for developmental classes.

    The heat map sups the area from Stoughton Rd. to Gammon. More specifically, if we look at that part of South Madison that has the greatest number of individuals living in poverty, the population 25 and older, there are 18,614 individuals. Of that total 5.5% have less than a 9th grade education, another 6% with no HS diploma, 21% are high school graduates only, 3.9% have a GED or alternative credential, and 17.8% of that total population may have some college but no degree. When you look at those percentages, it represents a total 54.6% of the population or nearly 10,163 individuals. Median income for many in this area is at or less than the poverty rate. Even if you take 50% of that population, does that not indicate who, in this area, we should be focusing on? As employers remark the need for a quality workers to meet their employment demands, this is the precise population that needs our offerings to improve their employability with acquired and relevant skills. Also, be reminded that this data focuses on the population 25 years of age and older. The number of individuals and percentages increase substantially when the 18+ population is added. As a point of reference, the entire South Madison area that is being analyzed, there are 45,303 individuals age 25 and above and 47% have less than an Associates’ degree. That amounts to 21,473 individuals.

    Students don’t attend the south campus due to limited credit offerings and wrap around services. They don’t go to DTEC because of transportation, housing, childcare, feelings of inadequacy – a myriad of issues that can be mitigated by effective cohort groups and in an environment that is warm as opposed to chilling. If we could extend our academic programs and services to this community in the South – there is the distinct probability that quality of life and economic development enhancements can and will increase. And a ready workforce to meet workforce needs.

    Our mission is to provide open access. We will do this through a well-defined, south Madison initiative. We are a leader in accessible, affordable education that meets the evolving needs of our diverse communities. We have and will strive to enhance our accessibility to our diverse communities. The Madison College Promise will go a long way in providing affordable education. We are committed to students and diverse communities and by our focus through the South Madison Initiative we are evidencing that commitment. These beliefs represent the Mission, Vision, and Values of MATC as you have endorsed and committed yourselves to.

    The College has also reviewed the enrollment potential in the south Madison initiative. We have stated publicly that a facility between 50,000 and 75,000 sq. ft. would be optimal. We have used a metric that was used to develop our facilities during the referendum with potential FTES generator. Also, we take into consideration the types of classes that would be offered. The College has projected the need for 15 classrooms at 1,000 sq. ft. each. Based on a conservative estimate of each student taking 1.5 credits, 17 students per class (our college- wide average), 9 hours a day and 4 days a week would yield 459 FTES per term. That does not include 2-3 science labs and sufficient space for offices, academic success center, and

    other support mechanisms. In the range of 450 – 500 credit FTES with even 70% in the transfer credit arena, it would yield approximately $2.8 million at $4000 per FTES. A new south would have degree programming along with the various Bridges that are successful in transitioning individuals into careers. Additionally, the South Madison facility could have different alternative programming (e.g. Weekend College), alternative scheduling, and greater use of the facility 7 days a week. I would also envision a collaborative between the new west and the new south to share labs wherein advance science labs could be accessed. Additionally, a South Madison Initiative would have to be located that takes full advantage of public transportation as well as easily accessible by vehicular traffic.

    With the tenets of our Mission, Vision, and Values, our commitment is to simply serve our communities, provide access to our programming, and commit ourselves to our diverse communities. The recommendation being presented this evening takes into consideration the foundation of our existence – our mission.

    RECOMMENDATION 1 CONSIDERATIONS (DTEC)

    As you heard at the Board Development Session on Facilities on March 23, there are several options with DTEC. Let me briefly go through them and comment on each one.

    1. Sell the entire site for approximately $12 million dollars. This option allows us to gain funds to reapply to investments in what we do and how we serve students and our communities. It saves the college $900,000 in annual operational costs. Do we need a referendum to sale? NO What will we do with the proceeds and does it require a referendum? YES What would happen to the savings in operational costs? Realigned with long term needs of the College. Be reminded that we are developing a long range plan for fiscal sustainability without constant cuts. This plan will address programs, student enrollment, hiring, scheduling, etc. Is this a viable option? YES

    2. Ground Lease Entire Site – MATC would retain ownership and ground lease the entire site to a developer/entity. It saves the college $900,000 in operational costs. It provides an annual revenue stream to the college to address potential and long term shortfalls as well as investing in how we better serve students and our communities. There has been estimates of anywhere from $700,000 - $900,000 for potential annual rent. As the Attorney General (AG) has opined, we can enter into this type of agreement with our Board’s approval and can be up to 99 years. There is a potential of adding $1.8 million annually to our operational budget. If we actually only received $500,000 in rent annually, it will allow us to effectively address the long term shortfall aligned with our plan. Does this option require a referendum? NO Is this a viable option? YES

    3. Ground Lease Partial Site – The same as previously discussed in the ground lease of the entire site. There is thinking, however, that a partial ground lease would not yield the annual rents that allow us to continue to invest in our students and communities. At best, we could only gain a $450,000 savings in operational costs. And still have to do extensive work to the building in the space we would occupy. Does this option require a referendum? YES – in order to get funding to do the remodels. Is this a viable option? NO

    4. Lease 40,000 (put a number upward to the full assignable capacity of the building) square feet to non-profits. This is a wonderful concept that has seen success in Boston, Denver, and Austin. Their “non-profit” centers have a long standing history and dollars to ensure sustainability. We have met with numerous non-profits and the barriers that can’t be overcome – long-term sustainability. Even if the non-profits rented a portion of the building, we would still have to do the remodeling and maintain operational costs with very little dollars to be realized to offset costs. Rents in a Class C building would probably not exceed $12/ sq. ft. And. If no remodel was done on space assigned to non-profits, rents in the vicinity of $5/ sq. ft. would not come close to offsetting our operational costs. Would we have to go to a referendum? YES, in order to get funding to remodel DTEC. Is this a viable option? NO

    5. Own entire site – owning the site without any other revenue being realized we would have to fund all remodeling costs and continue to assume all operational costs. Quite frankly, we don’t need 168,000 additional square feet when student enrollment is continuing its decline and programs are being restructured, repurposed, realigned and most significantly, the need for land base classes is decreasing. The assumption that maintaining a facility in downtown is important for local residents to have a college to attend is not reasonable due to the large number of individuals who have baccalaureate degrees or higher and at minimum, AA degrees. These students would be accessing institutions that provide graduate studies or programs that result in a baccalaureate, not an associate’s degree. Subsequently, maintaining the downtown facility would not be in the best interest of the college nor its mission. We need to focus on areas of greatest need and providing opportunities for greater access. Again, we would have to go to a referendum to get funding to completely remodel the building. And what we will have subsequent to the remodel is still operational costs with a declining enrollment and reduced programming. Is this a viable option? NO

     

    RECOMMENDATION 2 CONSIDERATIONS (SOUTH CAMPUS INITIATIVE)

     

    I will not go through all of the options we identified 2 weeks ago at the Facilities Session. I will try and paint the picture of the need and how it fits with our mission in South Madison.

    Earlier, I talked about our mission, vision and values. That is the foundation from which to talk about the south community – not just in zip code 52713 but supning from South Broadway over to Gammon and westward. In this area of individuals 25 years and older, 63% of the population has no bachelor degree; in fact, 37% of the population resulting in nearly 7,000 residents not having a post-secondary degree, certificate or diploma. If we look at the 18+ population they constitute 75% of the total population of nearly 23,000 residents. These residents have many other issues to deal with that are related to the poverty indices.

    We have looked at what are the concentrated barriers to opportunity in Dane County and I refer you back to the heat map. Those elements include the risk thresholds are represented by percent of risk:

    The high concentration of barriers to opportunity is in the area that we intend to serve. If we can effectively serve this community, we will impact the job market because many of the residents currently under or unemployed will receive training leading to employment. We know that with our 93+% placement rate it is fairly certain, statistically, that these individuals will be employed after training, or move on to 4 year institutions to be educated in disciplines where there is great need for people of color and women – STEM field being one of them. These students are coming to Truax or DTEC. We must make it accessible so they can attend, get the support necessary, and be, most of all, successful. Hence, why wrap around services are key.

    The south campus would be located so as to be accessible to many individuals. It does not become a dumping ground for a particular group or education background, thus, in a programming aspect classes must lead to a degree, certificate or diploma. The use of bridge programming has to be present to prepare a high number of these residents to receive requisite skills to complete successfully.

    As we minimize some of the barriers we can look to building a great environment around key offerings and services. And, as I previously stated, in the range from 450-500 FTES would be sustainable and we are meeting the needs of the broader community.

    Let’s look at this map (general area). If we ultimately move to Option 1, our service will be to all of south Madison and it will be secure, safe and accessible. Additionally, we can integrate class availability with the new west campus to complement or provide additional opportunities.

    Option 1 in the south, that does not require a referendum, will have sufficient space and parking. The annual operating cost as compared against the Villager is approximately

    $250,000 more and may be less when compared to the interim solution at Villager. We would fund this through our $1.5 million borrows to purchase and build-out. The cost of infrastructure upgrade would be in the vicinity of 1/5 to 1/4 of the cost of similar infrastructure upgrades at DTEC. Keep in mind also the funding capability in relationship to the options of sell or ground lease the entire DTEC building. Based on the position statement from WTCS, any build to suit would require a referendum – either a no-cost or revenue bond. Other options, WEAC building, purchase and remodel of former WPS building would require a referendum in the purchase of either of these buildings; a lease of the WEAC building would require a number of $1.5 million borrows for remodeling projects and the annual operating costs would be excessive ($1.4 million), There are leasing possibilities on Rimrock; however, the operating costs would be more expensive than if we bought and renovated.

    Expansion of Villager is an option wherein programs can be established that lead to degree as well as providing key student services. This is an interim placement until the College can commit fully to a space where the nature of the campus is comprehensive as opposed to simply, an access point.

    To those who believe that we are not serving all of the counties in our district, I can only point to the excellent work happening at our regional campuses as we continue to serve and enhance our programs in areas outside of Dane County.

    I have provided the key issues related to both DTEC and the South Madison Initiative in an Executive Summary of both.

    In summary:

    Madison Area Technical College has five campuses within the Madison metropolitan area. Two of those campuses are leased facilities and the remaining three are owned facilities: Truax Campus, Downtown Education Center, and Commercial Avenue Campus. The leased facilities have terms that will end in in 2016 (West) and 2017 (South).

    In the past 11 months, the College has taken action on leases and responded to information requests articulated in the District Board’s resolution of May 2015 regarding the Madison Metro campuses. This includes acting to conclude the lease at the current West Madison campus in June 2016 and, based on recommendations subsequent to the May 2015 resolution, identifying a new substantially smaller facility to serve the continuing education needs of the West Madison metro area as well as provide limited degree credit courses.

    The review of the Madison metro facilities has been guided by the College’s mission, vision, and values. Within that framework, the institution needs to determine how it will meet the education and training needs of residents in the Madison metro area in quality, modern, safe learning facilities, while recognizing the importance of remaining financially sustainable.

    • Downtown Education Center (DTEC)

    The DTEC facility is located on the same city block where the former Madison Central High School used to be. There are two buildings on the current DTEC site. One of those buildings was built prior to 1920 and the other in 1950 as an addition to the original facility. In 1987, another addition to the building resulted in a solarium. Numerous experts have reviewed the building’s infrastructure, classrooms, and labs. The cost estimates to put the facility’s operating systems and infrastructure into safe, efficient, working condition and update classrooms and labs to modern standards is estimated to be $30 million. Proceeds from the November 2010 referendum were used to create new modern facilities at Truax for select programs. Enrollment has significantly declined at DTEC due to the opening of the Health Education Center at Truax and the associated health care programs moving from DTEC to that facility. Similarly, the Barbering/Cosmetology program is scheduled to move from DTEC to Truax in 2017, vacating additional space in the DTEC facility.

    • South Campus

    Since 2001, South Campus has been at the Villager Mall. South Campus’s lease ends in July 2017. Enrollment is low at South Campus as there are limited degree credit course offerings and no comprehensive student services located at South Campus. South Campus originally was established to bring educational services to South Madison, an area of the College District that is one of the densest in terms of poverty and related barriers to economic opportunity.

    There are two recommendations for action.

    RECOMMENDATION 1: Ground lease the DTEC property.

    The District Board shall authorize the College to issue a request for proposals (RFP), within existing regulations and with appropriate contingencies, for a lease with a minimum term of 50 years targeted to commence July 1, 2018. Annual proceeds from the lease will be deposited into the College District’s General Fund and annually budgeted as expenditures. To the extent meeting regulatory requirements necessitates additional Board authorization it will be sought.

    BACKGROUND to RECOMMENDATION 1:

    During the 2016-17 and 2017-18 academic years, DTEC will continue to remain operational with its current course offerings and programs and those that are being temporarily re-located to DTEC from the current West Campus. Once a lease agreement for DTEC is agreed to, the College may be asked to provide cooperation in the form of authorizing a Lessee to obtain approvals for the purposes of site development; however, all expenses and effort should be the responsibility of the Lessee.

    Once the lease agreement is executed, a transition team, based on the model created for the closing of the current West Campus, will be convened to facilitate the movement of all programs, faculty, and staff into remaining Madison metro facilities. Specifically, liberal arts programming and continuing education will be distributed between Truax and the future new South and new West Madison campuses. College transfer art will relocate to Truax. Additionally, a marketing and communications plan will be developed to inform current and prospective students of the course and program location changes.

    RECOMMENDATION 2: Commit to serving the South Madison community.

    The District Board shall authorize the College to enter into negotiations to expand the current Villager Mall facility for a minimum period of 2 years (July 2017 through June 2019) with the option for additional one-year terms on the lease of the facility.

    The District Board shall also authorize the College to identify and negotiate terms for a purchased or leased facility in South Madison that meets the instructional and student support needs previously identified by the College. The College shall also identify the associated financial resources for such a facility.

    BACKGROUND to RECOMMENDATION 2:

    During the course of 2015-16, the College identified in South Madison a number of potential facilities that could be financed within existing regulations and meet the identified instructional and student support needs. However, none of the facilities that can meet these needs is available prior to the 2017-18 academic year.

    With additional square footage at the Villager Mall and in addition to existing programming, the College will offer courses leading to degrees in health care occupations and liberal arts. Bridge programs (programs that combine adult basic education with degree credit learning), continuing education and programs focused on small business development and entrepreneurship will also be offered at this location. Student services will be provided on-site and the College will also pursue identifying additional parking options and providing shuttle services to students attending this campus.

    The aforementioned academic programs and associated student services will be located in a more expansive facility, once identified and secured. Additionally, the human services and early childhood education programs along with the School of Academic Advancement will be located in a new facility. The renovation of any new facility will be funded through renovation borrows that are limited as well as dollars set aside from lease payments identified in Recommendation 1.

    I would also like to remind the Board of upcoming forums that will provide opportunities to further discuss these recommendations and have the public “weigh-in” on the recommendations.

    April 12, 2016, Student Forum, Downtown Education Center, Room D240, 3:00pm –4:00 PM April 12, 2016, Community Forum, Downtown Education Center, Room D240, 6:00 –8:00 PM April 13, 2016, Student Forum, Truax, Room C4202, 2:00 – 3:30p

    April 14, 2016, Community Forum, Fountain of Life Church, Sanctuary Room, 6:00 –8:00 PM

    April 20, 2016, Special Board Meeting/Public Comment on Metro Campus Recommendation, Truax, Room B3253/3243, 4:30 –6:30 PM

    May 4, 2016, Board Decision, Truax, Room B3252/3243, 5:30p

  5. Metro Campus Reports

    Executive Summary Metro Campus Report, March 2016
    Metro Campus Report, February 18, 2015


    Executive Summary Metro Campus Report – March 2016

    Downtown Education Center

    • 168,000 sq. ft. of programmable space

    • Hosts degree credit and non-degree credit programs

    Rehabilitation Costs

    • $14-$19 million in needed maintenance work

    • $10-$15 million to renovate classrooms and labs

    Building Use and Programming

    • 25% vacant space due to program re-location to new facilities at the Truax Campus. Avg. room utilization of 21% at DTEC in FY15.

    • Headcount enrollment decline of 25% between FY11-FY15 due in part to health programming moving to new facilities at Truax.

      • 40% decline in student FTE between FY11 and FY15.

    • FY18 Cosmetology moving to Truax vacates an additional 5,000 sq. ft.

    • 24% of student FTEs in non-degree programming in FY15.

    • Very limited course enrollment of UW students at DTEC (>0.5%)

    • Programs that can be completed solely at DTEC: early childhood education, human services, animation, college transfer associate degree, college transfer- art.

    Fixed Costs

    • FY15 - $909,000

    • FY15 Fixed Costs per FTE student - $1,161/student
       

    South Madison - Need

    • The area of South Madison has numerous census blocks where multiple barriers to opportunities thresholds are exceeded. (Capital Area Regional Planning Commission, 2014)

    • South Madison is one of the densest areas of poverty in the College District.

    • Nearly 50% of the adult population 25 years of age and older has an education level between some high school and some college, compared to 31% for the entire city of Madison.

    • Info. on barriers to opportunity is at: www.capitalregionscrpg.org/?p=1399

    Current Programming and Services

    • 44% of student FTEs in non-degree credit programs in FY15

    • No ability to complete a degree at South Campus

    • No student services related to student achievement and retention

    Future Programming and Services

    • General education/college transfer; developmental education (ABE/GED/ESL); non- credit, business-related courses

    • Enrollment services, academic advising, testing center, library and tutoring services, counseling, career and employment services, student life programming

    • Space for: classrooms and labs; library and tutoring space; faculty and staff offices; student service operations; meeting rooms; and student lounge

    South Madison Area Comprehensive Campus Attributes

    • Provide ability for students to earn a degree without taking courses elsewhere

    • Serve as catalyst for economic development; partner with community-based organizations

    • Reduce student apprehension of attending Truax

    • Connect to other Metro campuses via shuttle service

    • Accessible via the Beltline (Hwys 12&14) and Metro Bus

      • Attractive to students in west Madison metro area


    Metro Campus Report

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